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I wanna return several arrays and hashes from a sub. When I execute the sub, the first output array wraps all the outputs toguether and the others keep empty. Pls see this example:

The main file script.pl has:

use mymodule;
my (@o1, $o2)=mymodule::mysub;
print "o1 gives ".$o1[0]."  ".$o1[1]."  ".$o1[2];
print ", and o2 gives ".$o2."  \n";

File mymodule.pm looks like:

package mymodule;
sub mysub{
   my @a = ('a', 'b');
   my $b = 4;
   return (@a, $b);
   };
1;

Running script.pl will return o1 gives a b 4, and o2 gives .

As you see, the correspondence of (@o1, $o2) to the values (@a, $b) returned by the module is not preserved.

Can anyone help me here? Thx a lot!


thx for the explanation. However i cannot obtain the aimed result thru your suggestion. This code:

my ($o1_ref, $o2)=mysub;
my @o1 = @{$o1_ref};
print "o1 has ".$#o1." elements, o2 has ".$#o2." elements\n";
print "the first element of o1 is ".$o1->[0]."\n";

sub mysub{
   my @a = ('a', 'b');
   my $b = 4;
   return (\@a, $b);
   };

will return

o1 has -1 elements, o2 has -1 elements
the first element of o1 is 

Thus it does not work for my perl 5.14.

share|improve this question
4  
It's impossible to return hashes and arrays from subs. the only think a sub can return is a list of scalars. It's up to you to devise a mean of recreating arrays and hashes from those scalar, but most people just return references (since those are scalars). – ikegami Apr 4 '14 at 18:29
    
Easiest solution is to reverse the order of the returned values (return $b, @a). But the best solution is to return a reference to the array. – Dave Cross Apr 5 '14 at 8:49

It's time you learn about References.

In Perl, you can return a single list of items from a subroutine or have a single list of items for import. Only a single list, so if I attempt to return two arrays, Perl will put them into a single undifferentiated list:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);

my (@a, @b) = foo();
say join ": ", @a;
say join ": ", @b;

sub foo {
    my @first = qw(one two thee);
    my @second = qw(uno dos tres);
    return (@first, @second);
}

If you run this, you see that all of the data is returned to @a and nothing in @b.

References allow you to get around this restriction. A reference is simply a pointer to a place in memory that actually contains your data. That data could be a scalar ($foo), an array (@foo), or a hash (%foo). Since a location in memory is a single bit of data, references allow you to have an array that contains references to other arrays giving you an array of arrays. Or an array of hashes, or a hash of hashes, or all sorts of more complex data structures.

Let's look at your module and modify it's code a wee bit:

sub mysub{
   my @a = ('a', 'b');
   my $b = 4;
   return (\@a, $b);  # Look I added a backslash!
};
1;

That backslash says I am not returning an array. Instead, I am returning a location in memory where that array lives.

Now my program can do this:

my ($o1_ref, $o2) = mymodule::mysub();   # We'll talk about this later..

Another slight change in your code. My first item I'm returning isn't an array, but a reference to an array. Now, all I have to do is dereference it (that allows me access to the array):

my @o1 = @{ $o1_ref };

You dereference by putting the sigil of the data structure in front of your reference. You could even have done this:

my @o1 = @$o1_ref;

I don't like this because it's too easy to miss the @$ combination. Using curly braces emphasizes that you are dereferencing an array reference.

Now, the rest of your program should work.


Bonus Advice

Take a look at the Exporter module. It's a standard module that comes with Perl.

This will allow you to export your functions from your module, so you don't have to prefix it with your module's name:

package Mymodule;              # Custom says to give modules capital names.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Exporter qw(import);

our @EXPORT_OK = qw(mysub);  # A list of all the subroutines you want main to use

sub mysub { my @a = qw(a b); my $b = 4; return (\@a, $b); } 1;

Now, all you have to do is say mysub in your main program:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Mymodule  qw(mysub);     # Include a list of what you want imported
use feature qw(say);          # Better "print" than "print"

my ($o1_ref, $o2) = mysub();
my @01 = @{ $o1_ref };
say "o1 gives ".$o1[0]."  ".$o1[1]."  ".$o1[2];

In Response to This

Here's your code:

my ($o1_ref, $o2)=mysub;
my @o1 = @{$o1_ref};
print "o1 has ".$#o1." elements, o2 has ".$#o2." elements\n";
print "the first element of o1 is ".$o1->[0]."\n";

sub mysub{
   my @a = ('a', 'b');
   my $b = 4;
   return (\@a, $b);
};
  • There's no array @o2, so $#o2 is invalid.
  • $# returns the LAST index and not the number of items. Use scalar function to get the number of items in an array.
  • You've already dereferenced @o1. I did that to simplify the problem. Now, you're dereferencing the deferenced item when you do $o1->[0]. By the way $o1 doesn't exist as a variable.
  • Always use strict and warnings pragmas. You'd catch a lot of the errors when you use these.
  • Use say instead of print. You forgot the \n on the end again. If you're going to do that, use say with use feature qw(say);

Corrected Code

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);

my ($o1_ref, $o2) = mysub();
my @o1 = @{$o1_ref};

say "\@o1 has " . scalar @o1 . " elemenets";
say "The first element of \@o1 is '$o1[0]'";
say "The second element of \@o1 is '$o1[1]'";
say "\$o2 is equal to  '$o2'";

sub mysub{
    my @a = ('a', 'b');
    my $b = 4;
    return (\@a, $b);
};

The output:

@o1 has 2 elemenets
The first element of @o1 is 'a'
The second element of @o1 is 'b'
$o2 is equal to  '4'

All correct.

share|improve this answer

Or pass back a array ref

#!/usr/bin/perl
sub mysub{
   my @a = ('a', 'b');
   my $b = 4;
   return (\@a, $b);
 };

my ($o1, $o2) = mysub();
print "o1 gives ".${$o1}[0]."  ".${$o1}[1]."  ".$o1[2];
print ", and o2 gives ".$o2."  \n";
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, dont know how to recover the returned values this way. – user152037 Apr 4 '14 at 18:27
    
Did you mean how to deref back to an array? my @test = @{$o1}; Incidentally, I've not coded in perl for a while but I did always like to return hashes like the other answer suggested. – user3472874 Apr 4 '14 at 18:37

The way you're doing it doesn't work with Perl. The @a is expanded and just the first part of the list that contains @a and $b.

Arrays, in assignment lists, are "greedy". This works:

my ( $o2, @o1 ) = gimme();

But this doesn't:

my ( @o1, $o2 ) = gimme();

because everything is assigned to @o1. Whereas, the scalar-first assignment list pulls the first return off the list and assigns it to the scalar $o2 and the rest to @o1.

share|improve this answer
    
well, it would pretty much keep clarity in my code if i can keep the outputs $o1 and $o2 as separate variables. If it is possible, i would prefer... thx – user152037 Apr 4 '14 at 18:19

Perl cannot return arrays from a sub. Instead, return @a as an arrayref as follows:

package mymodule;
sub mysub{
  my @a = ('a', 'b');
  my $b = 4;
  return (\@a, $b);
};

Use the arrayref as follows:

use mymodule;
my ($o1, $o2)=mymodule::mysub;
print "o1 gives ".$o1->[0]."  ".$o1->[1]."  ".$o1->[2];
print ", and o2 gives ".$o2."  \n";

Bonus: If you need the index of the last element of the arrayref (perhaps you want to iterate through the arrayref to build back an array?):

$last_index = $#$o1;

As someone else recommended, I recommend you learn about Perl References.

share|improve this answer

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