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I'm using interfaces in this case mostly as a handle to an immutable instance of an object. The problem is that nested interfaces in C# are not allowed. Here is the code:

public interface ICountry
{
    ICountryInfo Info { get; }

    // Nested interface results in error message:
    // Error    13  'ICountryInfo': interfaces cannot declare types
    public interface ICountryInfo
    {
        int Population { get; }
        string Note { get; }
    }
}


public class Country : ICountry
{
    CountryInfo Info { get; set; }

    public class CountryInfo : ICountry.ICountryInfo
    {
        int Population { get; set; }
        string Note { get; set; }
        .....
    }
    .....
}

I'm looking for an alternative, anybody would have a solution?

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1  
Is there any particular reason why you want ICountryInfo to be nested? –  AakashM Feb 18 '10 at 8:45
2  
Yes, the application contains over 100 classes with many nested classes bearing the same names. It is much cleaner if I retain that setup. As for using interfaces, it's a way of getting their immutable counterparts. Once the objects have been instantiated, the main application mostly deals with their corresponding interfaces using the dependency injection pattern. –  ericdes Feb 18 '10 at 11:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

VB.NET allows this. So, you can create a VB.NET assembly only with the interface definitions that you need:

Public Interface ICountry
  ReadOnly Property Info() As ICountryInfo

  Public Interface ICountryInfo
    ReadOnly Property Population() As Integer
    ReadOnly Property Note() As String
  End Interface
End Interface

As for the implementation, C# does not support covariant return types, so you must declare your class like this:

public class Country : ICountry {
  // this property cannot be declared as CountryInfo
  public ICountry.ICountryInfo Info { get; set; }

  public class CountryInfo : ICountry.ICountryInfo {
    public string Note { get; set; }
    public int Population { get; set; }
  }
}
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If ICountryInfo has no reason to exist outside ICountry, then why shouldn't you just put the properties of ICountryInfo in ICountry and dismiss the idea of nested interfaces?

An interface that hasn't a meaning of its own without another interface doesn't make sense to me, as an interface on itself is useless if not implemented by a class.

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+1 I'd agree totally. There seems to be no need to have an ICountryInfo in this example. –  Ian Feb 18 '10 at 10:22
    
Well, I just extracted the sample code from an application that contains over 100 classes with many nested classes bearing the same names. It is much cleaner if I retain that setup with nested classes. As for using interfaces, it's a way of getting their immutable counterparts. Once the objects have been instantiated, the main application mostly deals with their corresponding interfaces using the dependency injection pattern. I don't want to modify the nesting structure in a way that would result in unpractical code. –  ericdes Feb 18 '10 at 11:39
3  
While I agree that the example given doesn't really make sense and would be better expressed as a single interface, it doesn't mean the idea is invalid. If for instance the ICountry interface had a collection of ICountryInfo objects instead of just one, then it would obviously not work to flatten it out into a single interface. ;) –  CptRobby Sep 27 '13 at 14:43

Not being able to declare interface and enums in interfaces is really irritating and a flaw in the language.

It breaks encapsulation and does not allow you to represent the UML composition association in code. For example: When I have the classes FunctionCall and FunctionCallParam, function call param would probably be defined as a nested class or interface to hint that FunctionCall is a composition of FunctionCallParams -> When I delete a FunctionCall I should also delete its FunctionCallParams.

The fact the classes can be nested and interfaces cannot point out a problem. If any one can see a reason why classes can be nested and interfaces cannot please tell me, maybe i am missing something?

On a side note: The fact that Properties are not first class objects like functions is a real bummer. That fact the I cannot reference a property or function from an attribute is an even bigger bummer! The fact that I don't have macros is a though pill to swallow (How many times did you already implement INotifyPropertyChanged?). That fact that I can't do aspect oriented programming is solved by mono cecil (joepy!!).

But everything considered for now C# is still the best language around I think!

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This will work just fine, no need to nest:

public interface ICountry
{
    ICountryInfo Info { get; }
}

public interface ICountryInfo
{
    int Population { get; }
    string Note { get; }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, but... this defeats the reasons why I created a nested class. ICountryInfo shouldn't have a meaning in any other places than from within ICountry. –  ericdes Feb 18 '10 at 9:36
5  
I agree with @ericdes. This is a situation where C# fails. –  user297691 Jun 21 '11 at 2:10

If the end goal is to use this with dependency injection, what's wrong with injecting them into each other instead of nesting?

public interface ICountry
{
    ICountryInfo Info { get; }
}

public interface ICountryInfo
{
    int Population { get; set; }
    string Note { get; set; }
}

and implement as:

public class Country : ICountry
{
    private readonly ICountryInfo _countryInfo;

    public Country(ICountryInfo countryInfo)
    {
        _countryInfo = countryInfo;
    }

    public ICountryInfo Info
    {
        get { return _countryInfo; }
    }
}

public class CountryInfo : ICountryInfo
{
    public int Population { get; set; }
    public string Note { get; set;}
}

Then once you set up your bindings for ICountry & ICountryInfo, CountryInfo will inject into Country whenever Country is injected.

You could then restrict the binding, if you wanted, to only inject CountryInfo into Country and nowhere else. Example in Ninject:

Bind<ICountry>().To<Country>();
Bind<ICountryInfo>().To<CountryInfo>().WhenInjectedInto<Country>();
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