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Can be template function within class template specialized outside of the class template? What is the syntax for it?

Following code gives unable to match function definition to an existing declaration in MSVC2010

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
struct Test
{
    template <typename S>
    void test(const S & t);

    //this works
    //template<> void test(const double & t) { std::cout << t << "D \n"; }

    T member;
};

//this doesn't work
template <typename T>
template <>
void Test<T>::test(const double & t)
{
    std::cout << t << "D \n";
}

int main()
{
    Test<int> t;
    t.test(7.0);
}

edit

I can use overload as suggested in answers, because I use it little differently, here is how:

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
struct Test
{
    template <typename S>
    void test() { std::cout << "Any type \n"; }

    template <>
    void test<double>() { std::cout << "Double! \n"; }

    T member;
};

int main()
{
    Test<int> t1;
    Test<int> t2;
    t1.test<float>();
    t2.test<double>();
}

and I want specialization for double outside of the struct.

Why I use it like this you ask? In real scenario I have built factory class which is used like:

Factory<SomePolicy> f;
f.create<MyType>(arg1, arg2, ...)

and I need specialization of create for specific type which won't pollute header file.

share|improve this question
    
Empty template <> can not follow non-empty template <typename S>. So you can only write something like this: template <> template <typename S> void Test<double>::test(const S & t){/*...*/} which is of course not what you want. And you can't declare or define specializations inside a class declaration. –  Constructor Apr 4 at 21:05

2 Answers 2

I do not believe you can specialize the inner template without specializing the outer. You could, however, use partial specialization:

Edit: It appears that only classes can be partially specialized. Again, I haven't tested it. You can find more here

template <typename T, typename S>
struct Test 
{
   void test(const S &s);
};

template <typename T>
struct Test<T, float>
{
   void test (const float &s)
   {
      <<do something>>
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think it makes sense to use struct instead of class in example code. Otherwise you have to explicitly mark some things public. –  Brian Apr 4 at 21:40
    
Thank you for your answer, but I think it no good. 1) this is uncompilable, 2) there is big difference between class template with 2 template arguments and class template with one argument and template member function –  relaxxx Apr 5 at 8:45
    
@Brian that's exactly why I used struct –  relaxxx Apr 5 at 8:55
    
I did say I hadn't run the code. Also, it's partially wrong. Editing now. –  muppetjones Apr 6 at 3:02

As far as I know you can't. But you can just overload your test function like this:

template <typename T>
struct Test
{
    template <typename S>
    void test(const S & t);

    void test(const double &); // <-- Add this

    T member;
};

template <typename T> 
// template<> // <-- Remove this
void Test<T>::test(const double & t)
{
    std::cout << t << "D \n";
}

Which should be totally equivalent to what you want to do.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, unfortunately, this won't work in my case. Please, see edit of my question. –  relaxxx Apr 5 at 8:54

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