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I am trying to make a bash script that will set up a proxy on my computer running ubuntu studio. This [1] tells me that I should set up the proxies for apt-get and Update Manager by creating a file 95proxies in /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/.

the problem is when I run this code.

sudo echo "Acquire::http::proxy "http://myproxy.server.com:8080/";
Acquire::ftp::proxy "ftp://myproxy.server.com:8080/";
Acquire::https::proxy "https://myproxy.server.com:8080/";
" > /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/95proxies

I get:

bash: /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/95proxies: Permission denied

I was able to create the file with touch by

sudo touch /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/95proxies

but when I go to put data in the file I still get the error message above.

[1] http://askubuntu.com/questions/150210/how-do-i-set-systemwide-proxy-servers-in-xubuntu-lubuntu-or-ubuntu-studio

share|improve this question

Try the below command,

sudo sh -c '(echo "Acquire::http::proxy \"http://myproxy.server.com:8080/\";"; echo "Acquire::ftp::proxy \"ftp://myproxy.server.com:8080/\";"; echo "Acquire::https::proxy \"https://myproxy.server.com:8080/\";") > /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/95proxies'

Because of the directory /etc/apt/apt.conf.d owned by root, you have to run the echo command in a separate subshell.

To add multiple lines to a file through echo command, the syntax would be

(echo first line; echo second line) >> output file
share|improve this answer
sudo printf 'Acquire::http::proxy "http://myproxy.server.com:8080/;\nAcquire::ftp::proxy "ftp://myproxy.server.com:8080/;\nAcquire::https::proxy "https://myproxy.server.com:8080/;\n"' > /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/95proxies

To print new line character (\n) in a file you must use printf not echo.

In your case bash will use each line of the command as a new command (because of ;, so > /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/95proxies will be executed as a command without sudo.

share|improve this answer

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