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I am new to object oriented development and appreciate your help in this regard. In my payroll system, I have four classes called ‘Payment’, ‘Salary’, ‘Earning’ and ‘Deduction’. preparing salary requires many types of earnings (like OT, Incentives, Spacial Allowance, payments for extra shifts, budgetary allowances, Brought forward amounts etc.) and deductions (like Insurance, Uniform, Loans,Recovery, Welfare, meals, salary advance taken etc.) So I split this in to two classes namely 'Earning' and 'Deduction'. Finally class 'Salary' is supposed to do the balancing part and class 'payment' will handle payment part (banking). Other type of payment is salary advance which is just an amount paid monthly. the relationships modeled, as follows… ‘Earning’ and ‘Deduction’ classes has a composition relationship with ‘Salary’ and ‘Salary’ is a derived class from ‘Payment’. I have implemented these relationships in my C# code as follows… My questions are

1.Whether I ve related classes in a proper way?

2.Is implementation of the relationships correct?

PAYMENTS

   class payment
    {
        public virtual void pay()
        {

        }
}

SALARY

class salary:payment
{
//Composition of ‘Earning’ class
    private earning E1;

    public salary()
    {
        E1 = new earning(this);

    }
//Calling calEarning() of ‘Earning’ class through ‘Salary’ class
    public void calEarningForSal()
    {
        E1.calEarning();
    }

//Implementing pay method of base class 
    public override void pay()
    {

    }

}

EARNING

  public class earning
    {
    //Since earning has a composition relationship with salary…
        private salary S1;

        internal earning(salary sal)
        {
            this.S1 = sal;
        }
    //This method will calculate earnings of employees
        public void calEarning()
        {

        }
    }

MAIN METHOD

Main()
        {
            salary newSal = new salary();
            newSal.calEarningForSal();
        }
share|improve this question
    
It depends on what you want. As usual. I don't get the intended role of 'earning' and 'deduction' here. –  Henk Holterman Apr 5 '14 at 8:27
    
But Salary IS-A payment sounds doubtful. What if a salary is payed in 2 parts? –  Henk Holterman Apr 5 '14 at 8:28
    
I agree with @HenkHolterman, I started to answer this then realised the ambiguity between a Salary and an Earning - you need to clarify each classes role. –  James Apr 5 '14 at 8:29
    
@Henk Holterman, Actually in this case, preparing salary requires many types of earnings (like OT, Incentives, Spacial Allowance, payments for extra shifts, budgetary allowances, Brought forward amounts etc.) and deductions (like Insurance, Uniform, Loans,Recovery, Welfare, meals, salary advance taken etc.) So I split this in to two classes namely 'Earning' and 'Deduction'. Finally class 'Salary' is supposed to do the balancing part and class 'payment' will handle payment part (banking). Other type of payment is salary advance which is just an amount paid monthly. Thanks! –  Charang Apr 5 '14 at 11:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When trying to work out whether to use Composition or Aggregation the simple question to ask is

  • Does A belong to B
  • Does A use B

In your case, you state

‘Earning’ and ‘Deduction’ classes has a composition relationship with ‘Salary’

So in layman's terms, what you are saying is Earning/Deductionbelong to a Salary, in other words, a Salary is made up of an Earning/Deduction (and however many other components). With that being said, I would expect your Salary class to look something like

public class Salary
{
    private Earning e;
    private Deduction d;

    public Salary()
    {
        this.e = new Earning();
        this.d = new Deduction();
    }

    public void override Pay()
    {
        ... 
    }
}

Earning/Deduction should not know about Salary, these classes are effectively components which make up what a Salary is. For example, your Earning class might look like

public class Earning
{
    public Earning()
    {
    }

    public void Calculate()
    {
        ...
    }
}

If Earning/Deduction need information from Salary then you can pass this information down, however, you should not pass a reference to Salary itself because that will break the composition relationship (and infact introduce aggregation between Earning/Salary).


On the inheritance stuff, if the base class Payment doesn't offer any more than a simple Pay method then I would recommend using an interface instead e.g.

public interface IPayable
{
    void Pay();
}

public class Salary : IPayable
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sir, Actually Payment class has few more methods like, makeSummary(), viewPayment(), viewPaymentHistory(), bank() etc. Kindly look at the comment given to @Henk Holterman for more details. Thanks! –  Charang Apr 5 '14 at 11:53
1  
@Chathur that's fine, you don't need to use the interface suggestion. If a Salary is actually made up of multiples of Earning/Deduction then I would just maintain an internal list for both - it still wouldn't make sense to pass Salary into Earning/Deduction. –  James Apr 7 '14 at 10:29

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