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I'd like to set up multiple has_many :through relationships in parallel. Here are my 2 standard and 2 join models:

User.rb

has_many :ownerships, dependent: :destroy
has_many :devices, through: :ownerships

has_many :bookings, dependent: :destroy
has_many :devices, through: :bookings

Ownership.rb

belongs_to :user, touch: true, counter_cache: :devices_count
belongs_to :device, touch: true

Booking.rb

belongs_to :user, touch: true, counter_cache: :bookings_count 
belongs_to :device, touch: true, counter_cache: :bookings_count

Device.rb

has_many :ownerships, dependent: :destroy
has_many :users, through: :ownerships

has_many :bookings, dependent: :destroy
has_many :users, through: :bookings

This current setup is NOT working as expected, there seems to be crosstalk between the join models. I want the join models to be independent and in parallel (i.e. Users can have relationships - Ownerships - with devices independently of being able to book them). I am not looking for a nested has_many :through relation here.

When I change the User Ownerships of a Device that seems to alter the number of Bookings and vice versa... any ideas on how should I be setting this up correctly?

share|improve this question

I think the first error you've got is you're calling two associations by the same name (users / devices)

To help any further respondents, the real question is --> how do you set up an association to pull from multiple join models?


Quick Fix

Rails associations are named primarily by their class, but because of conflicts, you should refrain from setting them twice. This is why you're seeing the current issue. A simple resolution will be to call the associations by different names:

User.rb
has_many :ownerships, dependent: :destroy
has_many :owner_devices, through: :ownerships, class_name: "Device", foreign_key: "ownership_id"

has_many :bookings, dependent: :destroy
has_many :booking_devices, through: :ownerships, class_name: "Device", foreign_key: "booking_id"

I am still looking for information on how you could set an association to use two models

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, I think it is on the right track. Are you sure the foreign_keys are correct as listed? Shouldn't they be ownership_id and booking_id, respectively? – John Trichereau Apr 5 '14 at 10:54
    
No problem - Nope I'm not sure if they're right :) I will have a look! – Richard Peck Apr 5 '14 at 10:55
    
This is just a quick fix; as for providing multiple sets of data for one association -- I'll need to learn about this – Richard Peck Apr 5 '14 at 10:56
    
Check the answer I posted, will try that first and play around with the it. But I think that's the gist of it, definitely needed the aliases and references to class_name. Now its just a matter of figuring out the correct foreign_ids. – John Trichereau Apr 5 '14 at 11:01
    
Let me know if it works. If you get errors / problems, let me know & we can work through it. One of the problems of answering "in depth" questions on SO is that I'd have to recreate your environment to gauge responses etc; something I'd prefer to let the asker to do, as its their setup which we're working to fix! – Richard Peck Apr 5 '14 at 11:04

This appears be a working solution following Rich Peck's suggestions:

User.rb

has_many :ownerships, dependent: :destroy
has_many :device_ownerships, through: :ownerships, class_name: "Device", foreign_key: "device_id", source: :device

has_many :bookings, dependent: :destroy
has_many :device_bookings, through: :bookings, class_name: "Device", foreign_key: "device_id", source: :device

Booking.rb (Join model)

belongs_to :user, touch: true, counter_cache: :bookings_count 
belongs_to :device, touch: true, counter_cache: :bookings_count

Ownership.rb (Join model)

belongs_to :user, touch: true, counter_cache: :devices_count
belongs_to :device, touch: true, counter_cache: :users_count

Device.rb

has_many :ownerships, dependent: :destroy
has_many :user_ownerships, through: :ownerships, class_name: "User", foreign_key: "user_id", source: :user

has_many :bookings, dependent: :destroy
has_many :user_bookings, through: :bookings, class_name: "User", foreign_key: "user_id", source: :user

To be honest, I'm a bit confused over why the foreign_key's need(?) to be set up as they are, so I'll have to do a bit more reading about it. Otherwise it appears to be functional, I don't see crosstalk between these join models anymore.

share|improve this answer
    
Good work - the foriegn_key is basically a variable to define the right column name if you're using non-conventional associations. It's best to think of the associations as methods, which have automated options derived from the name. If you're using a non-standard name, your arguments need to be amended to sui t:) – Richard Peck Apr 5 '14 at 12:03
    
BTW you might want to upvote my answer if it helped ;) – Richard Peck Apr 5 '14 at 12:04

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