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Is there a way to find out all function calls that will execute as part of a Program in C# world?

For example, given this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
     if (true)
     {
         CallTrueFunction();
     }
     else
     {
         CallFalseFunction();
     }
 }

Can I say through FxCop or some other system get to know CallTrueFunction?

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1  
As a minor note, guaranteed is too strong to be done (look up the halting program if you want to know why). However it is certainly possible to detect functions that could potentially be called. –  Guvante Apr 6 '14 at 0:39
    
You can cover some cases but at least not all. Take a function which takes an input (file, keyboard) and have a switch with 50 cases on the input and in each case is a new function call. Then it depends on the given data. –  user743414 Apr 9 '14 at 14:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted
+50

The short answer is no.

The slightly longer answer is no, not for any non-trivial program in any programming language.

The longer answer is that you are describing the halting problem more or less. There is no general way to determine which methods are reachable and which are not because to do so you would need to solve the halting problem.

Imagine a while loop and after the loop is the only call to myfunc(). Is myfunc() called? You can't know because the loop may or may not terminate. Perhaps the loop relies on a variable passed into the function. Perhaps it relies on input from the user. Whatever the case, if the loop terminates then myfunc() is called. If the loop doesn't terminate, then myfunc() is dead code that will never be called. Let's just say you do while(Console.ReadLine() != "G") { }. Does your program call myfunc()? Depends on the input!

And much like the halting problem, you can construct trivially small programs that always produce the correct answer, or create extremely tiny finite state machines that always produce the correct answer. But if you then take your static analysis program and run it on even a moderately small app the number of potential state combinations quickly exceeds the number of available atoms in the universe.

The only way to know if your program will call this function or that function is to run it and see if it does. Then you can say "For input X, in environment Y, on CPU Z, at date time D, given these versions of these system libraries, while the system was under this amount of CPU load, and this amount of I/O load, and where ground vibrations did not interrupt the hard disk, and where a cosmic ray did not flip any bits in memory, my program called the subset G of all available functions F".

If any of those variables change (the input being the primary one), then your previous analysis is incomplete.

Note: It is not even possible to make strong guarantees about which functions could possibly be called because reflection could call any function by constructing a string (so you can't even scan for function names), or even generate and inject brand new functions into your program.

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claps well done sir, well done –  iamkrillin Apr 13 '14 at 3:03
    
you convinced me with --> void main() { while (true) { } functioncall(); } –  halivingston Apr 15 '14 at 16:15

Depending on what you want to achieve, one possible way is to approach things the other way around and mark/remove everything that cannot be reached. With Resharper you can easily find all unused code. Going by your example, this would mark:

else
{
    CallFalseFunction();
}

as unreachable code. And it will suggest you change:

if (true)
{
    CallTrueFunction();
}

to:

CallTrueFunction();

Once you have cleaned up your project this way, everything that is left should be callable through some execution path and everything not relying on a conditional parameter should be called (assuming the program does not abort halfway).

This will not help you when trying to find what methods are called from a specific entry point in your app with specific parameters. If that is what you are looking for, maybe you can try looking to use a profiler that is capable of logging every method that is called. That way you logging will give you the list of functions.

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Your example works. But if that code is inside a function and the boolean a function parameter resharper can't suggest any change. –  user743414 Apr 9 '14 at 14:16
    
When the decision is taken by some input. –  user743414 Apr 9 '14 at 14:30
    
neither of these techniques are static. I need to know this at build/code analysis time, not at runtime. –  halivingston Apr 12 '14 at 2:06
    
@user986697 Resharper runs all its checks as you type/compile. Anything that is does not gray out should be callable in some way (it's not fool proof, but works pretty well). I'm not sure if it is possible to do anything more with pure static techniques though (see xenadu's answer). –  Sam Apr 14 '14 at 6:25

You can also use Visual Studio Code Coverage (if available in your version).

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd537628.aspx

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Can code contracts help here? If you can verify the state of certain values the Boolean test in this case then would you be able to determine the code paths? Not massively au fait with them. http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/projects/contracts/

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