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I'm trying to teach simple single neuron perceptron to recognize repetitive sequences of 1.

here is data I use to teach it:

learning_signals = [
  [[1, 1, 0, 0], 1],
  [[1, 1, 0, 1], 1],
  [[1, 1, 1, 0], 1],

  [[0, 1, 1, 0], 1],
  [[0, 1, 1, 1], 1],


  [[0, 0, 1, 1], 1],
  [[1, 0, 1, 1], 1],

  [[0, 0, 0, 0], 0],
  [[1, 0, 0, 0], 0],
  [[0, 1, 0, 0], 0],
  [[0, 0, 1, 0], 0],
  [[0, 0, 0, 1], 0],

  [[1, 0, 1, 0], 0],
  [[1, 0, 0, 1], 0],
  # [[0, 1, 0, 1], 0],

This is the array of learning templates each of them are array of data and correct result for that data.

As you see. last row commented - if I do uncomment it - perceptron will fail to learn. without it perceptron does not work right in case with "0101". So the question is:

  1. Is this task can be solved with single neuron perceptron or should I use few layered perceptron?
  2. How can I determine which tasks can be solved with such a simple perceptron? Are there any rule that I can apply to my task and say that it could be done with simple perceptron?

here is the code of perceprton written in coffeescript:

class window.Perceptron
  weights: []
  calc: (signal) ->
    @neuron.calc signal
  adjust: ->
  foo: 0.1
  calc: (signal) ->
    sum = 0
    for s, i in signal
      sum += s*@weights[i]
    if sum>0.5 then return 1 else return 0
    sum
  learn: (templates) ->
    @weights = []
    for i in [1..templates[0][0].length]
      @weights.push Math.random()

    li = 0
    max_li = 50000
    console.log @weights
    while true
      gerror = 0
      li++
      for template, i in templates
        res = @calc template[0]
        # console.log "result: #{res}"
        error = template[1] - res
        gerror += Math.abs error
        for weight, i in @weights
          @weights[i] += @foo*error*template[0][i]
      if ((gerror == 0) || li > max_li) then break
    if gerror == 0
      console.log "Learned in #{li} iterations"
    else
      console.log "Learning failed after #{max_li} iterations"
    console.log @weights
share|improve this question
    
What are your features? – user2357112 Apr 6 '14 at 6:55
    
not sure I understand you.... – SET Apr 6 '14 at 7:00
    
Is the perceptron directly assigning weights to each bit, or is something else going on? – user2357112 Apr 6 '14 at 7:01
    
Yes it is directly assign weights. Posted it's code. – SET Apr 6 '14 at 7:05
1  
Imagine the inputs to your perceptron as points in n-dimensional space. The perceptron algorithm attempts to find a hyperplane that divides the space into two sides, where one side contains all elements in one category and the other side contains all elements in the other category. Thus, it only works if the space can actually be divided in such a way. The inputs to your problem cannot be divided in such a way. – user2357112 Apr 6 '14 at 7:14

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