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Suppose I have the following code:

class A 
{
     public:
         void Funct1();
};

class B : public A
{
      public:
          void Func1();
          void Func2();
}

In main()

Declaring Object of type A

  A b = new B;
  b.Func1() // can access it;
  b.Func2() // cannot access

How can I make or access Func2 using object b especially in main

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3  
Start with code that compiles. b is of type A; not A* or B*. Public isn't valid either, and after you sort all of that out, read about dynamic_cast<> here, and here. –  WhozCraig Apr 6 '14 at 7:28
    
you cannot assign a pointer (new B) to a non-pointer variable (A). –  blackbird Apr 6 '14 at 7:30
    
Is it on purpose that you have A::Funct1(), instead of A::Func1(). –  blackbird Apr 6 '14 at 7:33
    
Don't forget to declare A::Func1() as virtual or overriding it won't work properly. Specifically, if you correct the declaration of b to A *b = new B();, then b->Func1() will actually call A::Func1(), not B::Func1(). –  SchighSchagh Apr 6 '14 at 7:37
    
Thanks i was suppose to declare as pointers i just forgot to type that in as making it A* b = new B. Suppose i did not want to put a virtual function func2 in A. I can easily solve the issue with that method. I meant for a case maybe you have 10 subclasses, are you going to virtualize every member functions even if some dont apply to other derived classes? –  Plengo Apr 6 '14 at 7:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You may use static_cast

A *b = new B;
B *bb = static_cast<B*> (b);

through bb you can access Func2().

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1  
This is usually a sign of design issues in the inheritance hierarchy. It would be better to use dynamic_cast because b can hold any objects which inherit from A, not only B objects. dynamic_cast can check if this conversion works. –  Jens Apr 6 '14 at 7:42
    
Thank you so much –  Plengo Apr 6 '14 at 8:12
    
Thanks that works. After lot googling i came across this B* bb = (B*) A; –  Plengo Apr 6 '14 at 8:24

There are a few problems in your code.

  1. You are using Void instead of void. Notice the uppercase vs lowercase difference.
  2. You are using Funct1 in A but Func1 in B. You can change Funct1 to Func1
  3. There is a missing ; at the end of B.
  4. Using B instead of new B. You have:

    A b = new B;
    

    That is a syntactically incorrect line. You can make it either

    A b = B();
    

    or

    A* b = new B();
    

Even after that change, you still have the problems you described.

There are two ways you can solve this:

  1. Use B b instead A b.

    B b;
    b.Func1();
    b.Func2();
    
  2. Use a virtual member function.

     class A 
     {
          Public:
              void Func1();
              virtual void Func2();
     };
    
     class B : public A
     {
           Public:
               void Func1();
               virtual void Func2();
     };
    

    Then, you can use:

    B b;
    A* aPtr = &b;
    aPtr->Func1();
    aPtr->Func2();
    
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Write a function which gets argument of Type A. Then you can send an argument of type A or B to this function,polymorphism works and the function inside class A or B works wrt what you want.

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In a statically typed language like C++, you can only call methods corresponding to the static type of an object in the current scope. In main, you declared b with static type A, restricting it to the interface defined in class A. If you want polymorphism, you need to declare the polymorphic functions in A and also add the virtual keyword.

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If object-oriented programming doesn't make sense for the problem you are trying to solve, don't use it. In C++, you don't need to put everything in classes, let alone in class hierarchies. Start with simple free-standing functions and use classes if you need them.

That being said, if you really insist, use dynamic_cast. In some situations, this may even be a legitimate choice. But if you feel that you need it all the time, then you must review your understanding of object-oriented programming.

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