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Using SQLite3 with Python 2.5, I'm trying to iterate through a list and pull the weight of an item from the database based on the item's name.

I tried using the "?" parameter substitution suggested to prevent SQL injections but it doesn't work. For example, when I use:

for item in self.inventory_names:
    self.cursor.execute("SELECT weight FROM Equipment WHERE name = ?", item)
    self.cursor.close()

I get the error:

sqlite3.ProgrammingError: Incorrect number of bindings supplied. The current statement uses 1, and there are 8 supplied.

I believe this is somehow caused by the initial creation of the database; the module I made that actually creates the DB does have 8 bindings.

cursor.execute("""CREATE TABLE Equipment 
    (id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, 
    name TEXT,
    price INTEGER, 
    weight REAL, 
    info TEXT, 
    ammo_cap INTEGER, 
    availability_west TEXT,
    availability_east TEXT)""")

However, when I use the less-secure "%s" substitution for each item name, it works just fine. Like so:

for item in self.inventory_names:
    self.cursor.execute("SELECT weight FROM Equipment WHERE name = '%s'" % item)
    self.cursor.close()

I can't figure out why it thinks I have 8 bindins when I'm only calling one. How can I fix it?

share|improve this question
    
The number of columns is not the number of bindings. The number of "?"'s in the query is the number of bindings. –  S.Lott Oct 23 '08 at 10:38
    
Yes, I know. I just figured the code was somehow trying to use the bindings referenced by the "create table" statement. I didn't realize it referred to the number of letters in the item itself. –  crystalattice Oct 23 '08 at 10:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 100 down vote accepted

The Cursor.execute() method expects a sequence as second parameter. You are supplying a string which happens to be 8 characters long.

Use the following form instead:

self.cursor.execute("SELECT weight FROM Equipment WHERE name = ?", [item])

Python library reference 13.13.3: sqlite3 Cursor Objects.

share|improve this answer

I have spent half a day trying to figure out why something like this would give me an error:

cursor.execute("SELECT * from ? WHERE name = ?", (table_name, name))

only to find out that table names cannot be parametrized. Hope this will help other people save some time.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can do something like: cursor.execute("SELECT * from %s WHERE name = ?" % table_name, (name,)), although that may make your program vulnerable to SQL injection attacks. –  plok Oct 13 '11 at 11:15
3  
For situations where user input determines the table, I pull the name of the table out of a dict and raise an exception if the contents of the input are unexpected. Probably not the best way to go about it, but seems less liable to result in SQL injection. –  James Dec 7 '11 at 16:42
    
@James I'm curious, in what situations have you needed to change which table you're inserting into based on user input? Using a dict sounds like a pretty good idea for that situation, I use them whenever I would have used a switch statement. –  num1 Jan 5 '13 at 1:16

The argument of cursor.execute that represents the values you need inserted in the database should be a tuple (sequence). However consider this example and see what's happening:

>>> ('jason')
'jason'

>>> ('jason',)
('jason',)

The first example evaluates to a string instead; so the correct way of representing single valued tuple is as in the second evaluation. Anyhow, the code below to fix your error.

self.cursor.execute("SELECT weight FROM Equipment WHERE name = ?", (item,))

Also giving the cursor.execute value arguments as strings,(which is what you are doing) results in the first evaluation in the example and results into the error you are getting.

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2  
I think this should be the accepted answer –  Kirk May 23 '13 at 2:08

have You tried this ? :

for item in self.inventory_names:
    t = (item,)
    self.cursor.execute("SELECT weight FROM Equipment WHERE name = ?", t)
    self.cursor.close()

cursor.execute() expects a sequence (list,tuple) as second parameter. (-> ddaa )

share|improve this answer

Quoting (is that what the parens mean?) the ? with parens seems to work for me. I kept trying with (literally) '?' but I kept getting

ProgrammingError: Incorrect number of bindings supplied. The current statement uses 0, and there are 1 supplied.

When I did:

SELECT fact FROM factoids WHERE key LIKE (?)

instead of:

SELECT fact FROM factoids WHERE key LIKE '?'

It worked.

Is this some python 2.6 thing?

share|improve this answer
1  
If you're using sqlite3's parameter substitution (instead of Python's %s string interpolation), then the ? should not the be quoted at all, i.e. SELECT fact FROM factoids WHERE key LIKE ?. It just happens adding brackets in the SQL does not change the meaning, so SELECT fact FROM factoids WHERE key LIKE (?) is equivalent to without the (). –  Lie Ryan Apr 3 '11 at 17:49
    
If you're using Django and your query is SELECT fact FROM factoids WHERE key LIKE "%s" then you will also want to avoid the quotation marks too. cursor.execute() will not recognize %s as a binding in that query. So use cursor.execute("Select fact FROM factoids WHERE key LIKE %s", (key_name, )) –  MrOodles May 31 '12 at 16:44

each element of items has to be a tuple. assuming names looks something like this:

names = ['Joe', 'Bob', 'Mary']

you should do the following:

for item in self.inventory_names:
self.cursor.execute("SELECT weight FROM Equipment WHERE name = ?", (item, ))

by using (item, ) you are making it a tuple instead of a string.

share|improve this answer

Try

execute("select fact from factoids where key like ?", "%%s%" % val)

You don't wrap anything around the ? at all, Python sqlite will correctly convert it into a quoted entity.

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