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In C# MVC project, I used Ninject for IoC pattern, When I using constructor injection it works fine without any problem but when I use it as field injection, NULL reference exception occurred for _orderNotification.

public class ShopManager
{
    [Inject]
    private IOrderNotification _orderNotification;

    public ShopManager(string shopName)
    {
        //Do somethings
    }

    public int GetNotifyCount()
    {
        return _orderNotification.Count();
    }
}

Also I registered services in NinjectWebCommon,

kernel.Bind<IOrderNotification>().To<OrderNotification>();

Ninject version is 3.0

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Show Ninject version. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Apr 6 at 10:24
    
@HamletHakobyan version 3.0. –  mhdrad Apr 6 at 10:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

try this:

  public IOrderNotification _orderNotification;

  public IOrderNotification OrderNotification
        {
            get
            {
                return _orderNotification ??
                       (_orderNotification = DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<IOrderNotification>());
            }
            set { _orderNotification = value; }
        }

Also you can use it without constructor:

public class ShopManager
{
    [Inject]
    public IOrderNotification OrderNotification { get; set; }

    public int GetNotifyCount()
    {
        return OrderNotification.Count();
    }
}
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While this works this is bad design. Now you are basically using service locator - but you don't need to. –  BatteryBackupUnit Apr 7 at 5:56

If you use Ninject 2 or higher you can't inject to field. Refer to the Things that were in Ninject 1.x that are not in Ninject 2 article for more information.

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You are right, he should use property injection instead. –  BatteryBackupUnit Apr 7 at 5:56

Field injection was removed, but there is property injection which you can use instead:

public class ShopManager
{
    [Inject]
    public IOrderNotification OrderNotification { get; set; }

    public ShopManager(string shopName)
    {
        //Do somethings
    }

    public int GetNotifyCount()
    {
        return OrderNotification.Count();
    }
}

However, the recommended way to go is to use Constructor Injection. A half decent argument for property injection is when you can't control instanciation of the class or when you have inheritance where you would need to pass ctor parameters down (but remember, favor composition over inheritance!). To me your example seems simple enough to use constructor injection. Why don't you? (granted, i'm unfamiliar with asp.net mvc, so the question may seem silly).

EDIT: I verified that property injection as shown above works with ninject 3.2.2. This means i've tested it ;-) Also see https://github.com/ninject/ninject/wiki/Injection-Patterns for more info on what kinds of injection there are and when to use them.

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thanks for answer, But DependencyResolver is more helpful. and the question is not silly dude! I start IoC after the project become completed and published, so we should do something wrong like below to have the sprint release (Agile is bad, i hate it ;) ) –  mhdrad Apr 7 at 6:09
    
@HadiSharifi I've double checked it with Ninject 3.2.2 and it does work. Note this is Property not Field injection. –  BatteryBackupUnit Apr 7 at 10:46

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