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I'm trying to broadcast a current time once in 3 seconds and a current date once in 10 seconds. I'm spawning 3 threads: 1 listener, 1 for broadcasting time and 1 broadcasting date. this application is happening on my laptop.

I have a udp listener on my desktop (the same intranet) with which I check my broadcasts.

when I launch the broadcast application on the laptop, I immediately receive a time and a date on my desktop listener (this is obviously expected). the problem is that I only receive the first 2 broadcasts (a time and a date). subsequent broadcasts are not caught by my desktop listener, and I cannot explain why. my laptop app (which broadcasts) also has a listener and it picks them up just fine.

the desktop listener picks up the first set of broadcasts, which tells me that the broadcast is working, but I cannot understand why the laptop receives all broadcasts and the listener doesn't.

here's the full broadcast app code (it's quite long), any help is greatly appreciated.

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>
#include <WinSock2.h>
#include <ctime>
#include <string>
#include <Windows.h>
#include <process.h>
#include <conio.h>

#pragma comment (lib, "ws2_32.lib")
using namespace std;
#define PORT 7777

struct tm *currentTimeAndDate;
char currentDate[16];
char currentTime[16];

SOCKET sock;
char recvBuff[50];
int recvBuffLen = 50;
struct sockaddr_in Recv_addr;
struct sockaddr_in Sender_addr;
int len = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in);

void getDate()
{
    string s;
    char a[100];
    time_t t = time(0); // get time now
    struct tm *now = localtime(&t);
    strftime(currentDate, 80, "%d/%m/%Y", now);
}

void getTime()
{
    string s;
    char a[100];
    time_t t = time(0); // get time now
    struct tm *now = localtime(&t);
    strftime(currentTime, 80, "%H:%M:%S", now);
}

void recvFunct(void *param)
{
    while(1)
    {
        recvfrom(sock, recvBuff, recvBuffLen, 0, (sockaddr *)&Sender_addr, &len);
        cout << "received message: " << recvBuff << endl;
    }
}

void sendFunct1(void *param)
{
    while(1)
    {
        getTime();
        if(sendto(sock, currentTime, strlen(currentTime)+1, 0, (sockaddr *)&Sender_addr, sizeof(Sender_addr)) < 0)
        {
            perror("borhot send: ");
            _getch();
            closesocket(sock);
        }
        Sleep(3000);
    }
}

void sendFunct2(void *param)
{
    while(1)
    {
        getDate();
        if(sendto(sock, currentDate, strlen(currentDate)+1, 0, (sockaddr *)&Sender_addr, sizeof(Sender_addr)) < 0)
        {
            perror("borhot send: ");
            _getch();
            closesocket(sock);
        }
        Sleep(10000);
    }
}

int main()
{
    WSADATA wsaData;
    WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2, 2), &wsaData);
    sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, IPPROTO_UDP);
    char broadcast = 'a';

    if(setsockopt(sock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_BROADCAST, &broadcast, sizeof(broadcast)) < 0)
    {
        perror("broadcast options");
        _getch();
        closesocket(sock);
        return 1;
    }

    Recv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    Recv_addr.sin_port = htons(PORT);
    Recv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;

    Sender_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    Sender_addr.sin_port = htons(PORT);
    Sender_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("255.255.255.255");

    if(bind(sock, (sockaddr*)&Recv_addr, sizeof(Recv_addr)) < 0)
    {
        perror("bind");
        _getch();
        closesocket(sock);
        return 1;
    }

    _beginthread(recvFunct, 0, NULL);
    _beginthread(sendFunct1, 0, NULL);
    _beginthread(sendFunct2, 0, NULL);

    cout << "spawned threads, press any key to exit.. \n";
    _getch();
    closesocket(sock);
    WSACleanup();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
If you have to warn that your code is quite long, then that's probably a sign that you should try and narrow it down a bit to the more relevant parts. If we need more parts of the code, we will ask you for it. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 6 at 11:15
    
well, I thought it would be more efficient to post the whole code at once instead of making people ask for more code. problem is I had no idea where the mistake was. but I'll keep that in mind. –  icarus Apr 6 at 11:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your recvFunct uses Sender_addr to store the sender address. So your target address in the send function is compromised.

Your laptop's network card address is stored in that variable. That's the reason why you just stop sending broadcasts.

share|improve this answer
    
damn such a noobish mistake.. I suppose I got sloppy. thanks a lot mate. –  icarus Apr 6 at 11:20
    
I often use Wireshark just to see what my programs are doing on the network. Usually I get better answer faster than in any forum. Probably you could do so. –  harper Apr 6 at 11:24
    
Note that len is an inout parameter also. Might want to reinitialise it. –  david.pfx Apr 6 at 11:33
    
@david.pfx Yes, that's good style when you reinitialize it. But the current use of the variable results always in a value of sizeof(sockaddr_in). Therefore it works in the code excerpt. There are other problems in the code like the strange value 'a' in the parameter to setsockopt, the impossibility to stop any thread, unused variables a in getDate and getTime. But these are not problem related. –  harper Apr 6 at 11:43
    
thanks for the suggestions, I cleaned up the unused variables now that I'm finished with the main problem, I was aware of them. about the threads, don't they just die out when the main thread is finished? in this case I don't really need a 'safe shut down' on my child threads. is this considered bad practice? should I manually kill the threads before the parent thread finishes? –  icarus Apr 6 at 11:47

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