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I want to color only one bar in ggplot. This is my data frame:

area <- c("Północ", "Południe", "Wschód", "Zachód")
sale <- c(16.5, 13.5, 14, 13)
df.sale <- data.frame(area, sale)
colnames(df.sale) <- c("Obszar sprzedaży", "Liczba sprzedanych produktów (w tys.)")

And code for plotting:

plot.sale.bad <- ggplot(data=df.sale, aes(x=area, y=sale, fill=area)) +
  geom_bar(stat="identity") +
  scale_fill_manual(values=c("black", "red", "black", "black")) +
  xlab(colnames(df.sale)[1]) +
  ylab(colnames(df.sale)[2]) +
  ggtitle("Porównanie sprzedaży") 

I would like to have only one bar colored and 3 others to have default color (darkgrey, not black, it looks bad for me). How can I change color of only on bar or how to get name of the default color of bars to put them instead of black?

share|improve this question
    
If you don't want to map fill to 'area', why do you use it in your aes? It might be better to add a variable to your data frame that reflects the conditions you wish map to fill. But you need to describe your objectives more clearly. –  Henrik Apr 6 '14 at 12:56
    
I want to distinguish second bar form others by color and other bars should have default, unchanged color. That's what I want. –  tyskaj Apr 6 '14 at 13:03
    
For the example you've provided, scale_fill_manual is spot on. If you want to do it more "programmatically" then you'll need to provide some indicator (calculation, cut range, etc) that would make it possible to determine which bar(s) should be a different color. For your example, what condition indicated that Południe should be red? –  hrbrmstr Apr 6 '14 at 13:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Option 1: Change color of only one bar. Following Henrick's suggestion, you can create a new variable with NAs for the default color and character strings/factors for non-default colors (the first one happens to be red):

area.color <- c(NA, "withcolor", NA, NA)
plot.sale.bad <- ggplot(data=df.sale, aes(x=area, y=sale, fill=area.color)) +
  geom_bar(stat="identity") +
  xlab(colnames(df.sale)[1]) +
  ylab(colnames(df.sale)[2]) +
  ggtitle("Porównanie sprzedaży") 
plot.sale.bad

Option 2: Find the name of the default dark gray color you like. This is not the default color if you simply remove the scale_fill_manual line in your original code (in that case, you get four different pastels), so I assume you mean the grey color produced by the code chunk just above this paragraph, for those bars where area.color==NA. In that case, you might look at the source code (or args, anyway) for scale_fill_discrete:

> args(scale_fill_discrete)
# function (..., h = c(0, 360) + 15, c = 100, l = 65, h.start = 0, 
#     direction = 1, na.value = "grey50") 
# NULL

The default for na.value is "grey50". So if you wanted to use scale_fill_manual, you could do it like so:

plot.sale.bad <- ggplot(data=df.sale, aes(x=area, y=sale, fill=area)) +
  geom_bar(stat="identity") +
  scale_fill_manual(values=c("grey50", "red", "grey50", "grey50")) +
  xlab(colnames(df.sale)[1]) +
  ylab(colnames(df.sale)[2]) +
  ggtitle("Porównanie sprzedaży") 
plot.sale.bad
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that is exactly what I ment :) –  tyskaj Apr 6 '14 at 15:35

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