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I am examining an object dump of a file and I want to figure out all the possible addresses.

The approach I am using involves using perl and regex to extract all words

The format of the object file is like this

00000000000044444 <function>
    44448: 48 ca             add ....
    4444c: 48 ca 55          call ....
    44450: 48 ca 8d 55       jmp..

I am trying to extract 48 ca 48 ca 55 48 ca 8d 55

Currently, i thought that the regex /(\s[0-9a-f][0-9a-f]\s)/g would help however, that only extracts every other, i.e48, 8d, 55, as it parse 48 and then it cant parse ca because the previous space character has already been consumed (at least that is my understanding)

/(\s[0-9a-f][0-9a-f]\s)|([0-9a-f][0-9a-f]\s)/g but that parses things it shouldnt like an add instruction dd

Any help as to how I can only extract these pairs of numbers deliminated by a space?

Edit: I updated a more realistic format of the file.

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
Are these existing object dumps or are you running objdump and then wanting to analyze them? Is there some flag to objdump that could maybe give you more machine-readable format? – Andy Lester Apr 6 '14 at 18:29
    
These are dumps from running objdump. I am not sure if there is such a flag – bubbles Apr 6 '14 at 18:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of \s, you just want the word boundary \b.

while (<DATA>) {
    my @nums = m/\b([[:xdigit:]]{2})\b/g;
    print "@nums\n";
}

__DATA__
00000000000044444 <function>
    44448: 48 ca 8d 55
    4444c: 48 ca 8d 55
    44450: 48 ca 8d 55

Update

Given, you made your data more complicated with instructions after the hex codes, I'd lean toward making your regex more restrictive like so;

while (<DATA>) {
    if (/^\s+\w+:((?:\s[[:xdigit:]]{2})+)\b/) {
        my @nums = split ' ', $1;
        print "@nums\n";
    }
}

__DATA__
00000000000044444 <function>
    44448: 48 ca             add ....
    4444c: 48 ca 55          call ....
    44450: 48 ca 8d 55       jmp..

Outputs:

48 ca
48 ca 55
48 ca 8d 55
share|improve this answer
    
I should have just said that I'm just examining file generated by objdump. your initial answer seems to work well. Is there something the more restrictive regex captures that the first one doesn't? – bubbles Apr 6 '14 at 18:54
    
The other way around. The more restrictive regex avoids the possibility of ever capturing anything in the add,call,jump area. Honestly, I'd be tempted to just use a substr and then split. – Miller Apr 6 '14 at 19:03
    
Don't use [0-9a-f]! What if the characters are upper case? What if the file is in a different language. Perl has the class [[:xdigit:]] which represents any hexadecimal digit: Upper or lowercase. Latin or non-latin. See the Perl Regular Expression Reference. Remember, we are no longer in an ASCII world. – David W. Apr 6 '14 at 20:15
    
@DavidW. nod. An earlier version of my code used that character class, but it got copied over on edit. I doubt that's a bang ! worthy warning in this instance since he's parsing the output to a specific app, but it's a worthwhile habit to get in regardless. Btw, feel free to just edit next time. Thanks – Miller Apr 6 '14 at 22:26

Try this example that uses your regex in positive lookahead to perform overlapping matching:

$\ = $/;
while(<DATA>){
    print for m/(?=\s([0-9a-f][0-9a-f])\s)/g;
}

__DATA__
00000000000044444 <function>
    44448: 48 ca 8d 55
    4444c: 48 ca 8d 55
    44450: 48 ca 8d 55
share|improve this answer
    
I am very new to perl, what does $\ = $/ Currently I have foreach $line (<INFO>) { my @matches = $line =~ /(\s[0-9a-f][0-9a-f])/g; } – bubbles Apr 6 '14 at 18:30
    
$\ = $/ will add a \n after every printing. from code. If you can just copy the regex from my example into your code, it should work. Try it! – Sabuj Hassan Apr 6 '14 at 18:33
    
ok, it seems to work. looks like I will have to look more into this positive lookahead. so it seems that $\ = $/; isn't relevant to this. it seems that ?= seems to be the key. – bubbles Apr 6 '14 at 18:37
    
@bubbles Or don't worry about lookahead and overlapping, by using a word boundary \b instead of an explicit \s. – Miller Apr 6 '14 at 18:42
    
@Miller word boundary will pick match from input like 10.10.10.10 – Sabuj Hassan Apr 6 '14 at 18:43

Try this:

(([0-9a-f]{2}\s){3}[0-9a-f]{2})$

[0-9a-f]{2} is a pair of hex digits.

Group those with a space three times, and then look for another pair of hex digits after that.

The $ anchors it to the end of the line.

share|improve this answer
    
Going to look into those. I should have mentioned that it may or may not be always the same amount of digits per line – bubbles Apr 6 '14 at 18:25
    
Well, if you always know that the hex digit pair will be preceded by a space, you can do \s[0-9a-f]{2}. – Andy Lester Apr 6 '14 at 18:26
    
yes that is true but in that example, it would also parse 44 3 times from 444** – bubbles Apr 6 '14 at 18:27
    
What you can do is do this in two steps per line. First strip off the leading address ([0-9a-f]+:), and then analyze the hex digits that follow. – Andy Lester Apr 6 '14 at 18:30

You can use:

while(<DATA>) {
    print m/(?:(?<=:)|\G)( [a-f0-9]{2})(?=\s)/g;
}


__DATA__
00000000000044444 <function>
    44448: 48 ca             add ....
    4444c: 48 ca 55          call ....
    44450: 48 ca 8d 55       jmp..

The pattern is build to force byte to be consecutive with \G or to be preceded with :. (If it doesn't suffice you can add [0-9a-f]{5} before the :)

share|improve this answer
    
I like this solution. Don't find that many situations where \G is all that useful, but this is one. – Miller Apr 6 '14 at 19:06
    
Thanks, the main interest is to add more constraint. \G is not always easy to master, and once you master it, you don't think to use it! – Casimir et Hippolyte Apr 6 '14 at 19:15

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