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I know that with sed I can print

cat current.txt | sed 'N;s/\n/,/'  > new.txt
A
B
C
D
E
F

to

A,B
C,D
E,F

What I would like to do is following:

A
B
C
D
E
F

to

A,D
B,E
C,F

I'd like to join 1 with 4, 2 with 5, 3 with 6 and so on. Is this possible with sed? Any idea how it could be achieved?

Thank you.

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What if there are 8 lines in the file? Is it still 1 with 4, or is it 1 with 5, 2 with 6...? –  Lev Levitsky Apr 6 '14 at 19:16
    
It should be 1 with 5, 2 with 6, 3 with 7 and 4 with 8. Thanks! Also for the formatting :) –  MrD Apr 6 '14 at 19:22
    
@user3504232 Is the file guaranteed to have an even number of lines? –  Mike Apr 6 '14 at 19:38
    
@Mike Yes, it is guaranteed. –  MrD Apr 6 '14 at 19:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try printing in columns:

pr -s, -t -2 current.txt
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Wow, another cool utility I didn't know about. Upvote! –  Lev Levitsky Apr 6 '14 at 20:00
    
Such an easy an efficient solution, thank you. –  MrD Apr 6 '14 at 20:08
    
+1: Nicely done! –  jaypal singh Apr 6 '14 at 21:33

This is longer than I was hoping, but:

$ lc=$(( $(wc -l current.txt | sed 's/ .*//') / 2 ))
$ paste <(head -"$lc" current.txt) <(tail -"$lc" current.txt) | column -t -o,

The variable lc stores the number of lines in current.txt divided by two. Then head and tail are used to print lc first and lc last lines, respectively (i.e. the first and second half of the file); then paste is used to put the two together and column changes tabs to commas.

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1  
FWIW if you use "wc -l <current.txt" in place of "wc -l current.txt" you don't need the sed because wc doesn't output the filename... –  Mark Setchell Apr 6 '14 at 20:09
    
Thank you also, works great but @Scrutinizer's solution is just too nice ;) –  MrD Apr 6 '14 at 20:09
    
@MarkSetchell Neat! Didn't think of that, thanks. –  Lev Levitsky Apr 6 '14 at 20:19
    
@user3504232 Of course it is! Obviously that is the true answer to your problem. –  Lev Levitsky Apr 6 '14 at 20:20

An awk version

awk '{a[NR]=$0} NR>3 {print a[NR-3]","$0}' current.txt
A,D
B,E
C,F

This solution is easy to adjust if you like other interval.
Just change NR>3 and NR-3 to desired number.

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