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I know I can create a Binding from a Hash using ostruct, like this:

require 'ostruct'

not_in_locals = "we don't want this"
locals = {a: 1, b: 2}
my_binding = OpenStruct.new(locals).instance_eval { binding }
p my_binding
p eval("a", my_binding) #good, we want this
p eval("b", my_binding) #good, we want this
p eval("not_in_locals", my_binding) #bad, don't want it to access this, but it can

You can see the output here, which confirms the comments in the code: https://eval.in/132925

As you can see, the problem is that the Binding also binds variables in the local context that are not in the Hash. I'd like a method for creating Binding objects from a Hash, which are bound to nothing besides the keys from that Hash.

share|improve this question
    
what output do you expect of, let's say, eval ('true', my_binding)? –  tokland Apr 6 at 21:09
    
well "true" would be "true" in any binding, right? that's what i'd expect anyway. here's a really ugly, but working solution to my OP: eval.in/132941 (not that __string__ is bound too so it's not an exact solution) –  Jonah Apr 6 at 21:16
    
Well, if you wanted a completely "clean" binding (nothing defined at all except for your hash data), it should return nil. true if you are ok with the binding carrying all its environment with it. –  tokland Apr 6 at 21:19
    
hmmm... interesting. but isn't "true" just a language keyword, rather than lvar with a value? fwiw, as a practical matter a solution that was not clean in this sense (true = true) would be fine for me. –  Jonah Apr 6 at 21:22
1  
true is not a keyword, it's just a global value (unique instance of TrueClass). Anyway, I was referring to anything you can normally access, global values, methods of Object, Kernel, the list is pretty long in Ruby. BTW, it's a good question, unfortunately I don't know the answer :) –  tokland Apr 6 at 21:24

2 Answers 2

You could try something like this. It bypasses a straight eval() call for a helper class method call. The helper class method is called evaluate(), but it only works for very simple values (only Strings and Integers tested so far) and relies on inspect().

But if the types of the values you are dealing with is known ahead of time, you could modify this to work.

class HashBinding
  def initialize(hash)
    @hash = hash
  end

  def evaluate(str)
    binding_code = @hash.to_a.map do |k,v|
      "#{k} = #{v.inspect};"
    end.join(" ")
    eval "#{binding_code}; #{str}"
  end
end

not_in_hash = 'I am not in the hash'
hash = { :foo => 'foo value', :baz => 42}
hash_binding = HashBinding.new(hash)

hash_binding.evaluate('puts "foo = #{foo}"')
hash_binding.evaluate('puts "baz = #{baz}"')
hash_binding.evaluate('puts "not_in_hash = #{not_in_hash}"')

The output is:

ruby binding_of_hash.rb
foo = foo value
baz = 42
binding_of_hash.rb:10:in `eval': undefined local variable or method `not_in_hash' for #<HashBinding:0x007fcc0b9ec1e8> (NameError)
    from binding_of_hash.rb:10:in `eval'
    from binding_of_hash.rb:10:in `evaluate'
    from binding_of_hash.rb:20:in `<main>'
share|improve this answer
    
upvoting because i appreciate the answer and it does solve the problem, but, well, you have to admit that's quite a hack. –  Jonah Apr 9 at 2:55
    
Never claimed it wasn't a hack ;) –  Douglas A. Seifert Apr 9 at 4:18
    
More than hackish, using inspect just doesn't work in general, try to run this code: HashBinding.new(foo: Object.new).evaluate('puts "foo = #{foo}"') –  toro2k Apr 9 at 8:02

Here's another "less" hacky try that doesn't rely on "inspect" serialization.

require 'json'

class HashBinding
  attr_accessor :hash
  def initialize(hash)
    # Require symbol keys
    @hash = Hash[hash.map {|k,v| [k.to_sym, v]}]
  end

  def evaluate(str)
    binding_code = @hash.to_a.map do |k,v|
      "#{k} = @hash[:#{k}];"
    end.join(" ")
    eval "#{binding_code}; #{str}"
  end
end

not_in_hash = 'I am not in the hash'
hash = { :foo => 'foo value', :baz => 42, 'str' => "a string value"}
hash_binding = HashBinding.new(hash)

hash_binding.evaluate('puts "foo = #{foo}"')
hash_binding.evaluate('puts "baz = #{baz}"')
hash_binding.evaluate('puts "str = #{str}"')
hash_binding.evaluate('puts "not_in_hash = #{not_in_hash}"')
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is this is still more complex than the solution I posted in my last comment in the OP, which is itself too complex I think. I actually think the answer is that there just isn't a good answer, unfortunately. –  Jonah Apr 9 at 4:49

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