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I am implementing a new password storage procedure into my companies current product. It is a ASP.NET application with MS SQL Server.

Before they used 3DES encryption off the same common seed to encrypt, and to check a users authentication they just decrypted the password using the same seed.

I am implementing a SHA256 hash, with a salt that can not be decrypted.

Firstly, I understand that every salt should be different per user, but I don't understand where this salt would be stored? If its stored in the database, doesn't this void its purpose?

My idea was creating a salt by taking the first 4 letters of the username, the first 3 letters of the first name, and the first 3 letters of the last name, and converting it into a md5 hash and then using that as the salt without storing in the database. This sequence would be server side so that no hacker could know the sequence without the source code.

Is there any issues with what I am doing here?

Also is SHA256 acceptable or should I be looking at SHA512.

Thanks

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Why do you say 'every salt should be different per user' ? If that's the case then yes, you do have to store it or you'll never be able to do a valid comparison. I defined my SALT as a constant expression in the code; no site I've deployed has ever been hacked, though there have been several attempts. If that's good enough for them, might it work for you ? –  sh1rts Apr 6 '14 at 23:22
1  
@sh1rts: You should be using a random salt per user. A single salt for an entire site reduces security (one rainbow table works for every user account on your site then). –  mfanto Apr 6 '14 at 23:24
3  
@sh1rts: A salt that is the same for all passwords is not a salt, that's just some padding. –  Guffa Apr 7 '14 at 9:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

"Is there any issues with what I am doing here?"

Yes, there is. Obscurity is not security. Just because the salt is hard to find out doesn't mean that it's very secure. Figuring out how you created the salt would be a piece of cake compared to forcing the hash.

There is no need to keep the salt secret, just create a random number for each user and store along with the password. The purpose of the salt is to elliminate the advantages of using rainbow tables to crack all the passwords in a table. The salt just have to be different for most users (preferably unique, but that's not crucial).

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Can you explain how figuring the salt would be easy? If it is generated server side and then hashed? Like in a previous questions comment I made, if the salt is known, although expensive, cant a programmer adjust their brute force attack to add the known hash to each brute force string. I was always taught security through obscurity as long as its not the primary security mechanism. –  Nick Apr 6 '14 at 23:52
    
@user2338488: It's easy because it's known where it is. If the salt isn't stored separately, then it's calculated from values from the user, it's just a matter of trying the right values in the right combination. The salt isn't used to complicate brute force attacks, it's used so that an attacker has to use brute force instead of more efficient methods. Using obscurity in security can be worse than no security at all, because it gives a false sense of security. The primary security method should be good enough so that no obscurity is needed at all. –  Guffa Apr 7 '14 at 2:40
    
What do you mean it's known where it is? Trying the right values in the right combination to see what creates the salt? But the salt is in the hash, not in plainsight. You wouldnt know the salt unless you had successfully exploited the hash already? I understand salting is only used to prevent pre-computing. But if you knew the salt you could still pre-compute. e.g i know salt is _123 so to test if user password is 'password' i just pre or append the known salt to every brute attempt voiding the need for a salt.... –  Nick Apr 7 '14 at 3:13
    
@user2338488: Pre-computing only has any benefit if you have several passwords with the same salt. Otherwise it's just the same thing as brute force. –  Guffa Apr 7 '14 at 9:13
    
Okay, I understand. I still feel as if there is some added security (through expensive time in brute forcing) if the salt is unknown. The brute force will be easier to attempt if it knows the salt side of the string that has been hashed. Without knowing the salt, the brute force has to break down password length + 32 characters hashed in PBKDF2. Its going to be a long slow attempt. –  Nick Apr 7 '14 at 22:32

If you absolutely must implement this yourself (personally I'm a fan of MembershipReboot, then you should take a look at PBKDF2 for password storage.

Not only will it implement the salt properly, it also supports multiple iterations to help deter brute force attacks. You can find guidance for the number of iterations here.

Also worth noting, PBKDF2 is an acceptable NIST standard in case validation is a concern.

To answer your question about keeping the salt in the database, there's no need to keep it secret. The purpose of the salt is simply to prevent pre-computation of hashes, not obfuscate or 'encrypt' in any way.

Rainbow tables work by pre-computing passwords, and then when brute forcing, looking up the respective hash in the rainbow table. You can actually see how simple it is by googling MD5 hashes, and often in the search results you'll find the original input.

For example, if you google the string '5f4dcc3b5aa765d61d8327deb882cf99', you'll find it corresponds to 'password'.

By using a salt, the attacker must compute unique hashes for every possible password, instead of just a generalized list.

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If the salt is known though, (if stored in the database) in a brute force attack, every tested case can just have the known salt appended or prepended, thus voiding the use of the salt all together. This is why I believe the salt should not be stored in the database? –  Nick Apr 6 '14 at 23:36
    
@user2338488, as mfanto stated, the salt is used to prevent pre-computed hashes (eg a rainbow table). Salting isn't supposed to prevent computing hashes in real-time, so salts don't need to be secret. –  RoadWarrior Apr 7 '14 at 2:13

The salt is NOT supposed to be private. It is distributed along with the hash, usually prepended to it. The sole purpose of the salt is to make sure that if the same data is encrypted twice you never get the same output. By definition it has to be unique, but randomness or secrecy is not required.

You should also NOT create a random number per user. The salt needs to be different for every encryption, even for the same user. Just generate a random salt, use it to create your hash, prepend the salt to the hash, encode everything to base64, and store it. To verify the hash you decode to binary, extract the salt, use it to hash your input data and compare with the decoded hash.

Something that works well as a salt is a GUID. 128 bits, by definition unique, although not totally random, and available instantly without any additional code. Here is an example of an AES-256 encrypt and decrypt. Keep in mind in a real implementation you would want the plain text and key to be stored in SecureString objects...

Private blockSize = 128
Private keySize = 256
Private cipherMode = CipherMode.CBC

Protected Function AESEncryptStringToBase64(strPlainText As String, strKey As String) As String
    Dim Algo As AesManaged = AesManaged.Create()
    With Algo
        .BlockSize = blockSize
        .FeedbackSize = blockSize
        .KeySize = keySize
        .Mode = cipherMode
        .IV = Guid.NewGuid().ToByteArray()
        .Key = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(strKey)
    End With

    Using Encryptor As ICryptoTransform = Algo.CreateEncryptor()
        Using MemStream As New MemoryStream
            Using CryptStream As New CryptoStream(MemStream, Encryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write)
                Using Writer As New StreamWriter(CryptStream)
                    Writer.Write(strPlainText)
                End Using

                AESEncryptStringToBase64 = Convert.ToBase64String(Algo.IV.Concat(MemStream.ToArray()).ToArray())
            End Using
        End Using
    End Using
End Function

Protected Function AESDecryptBase64ToString(strCipherText As String, strKey As String) As String
    Dim arrSaltAndCipherText As Byte() = Convert.FromBase64String(strCipherText)

    Dim Algo As AesManaged = AesManaged.Create()
    With Algo
        .BlockSize = blockSize
        .FeedbackSize = blockSize
        .KeySize = keySize
        .Mode = cipherMode
        .IV = arrSaltAndCipherText.Take(16).ToArray()
        .Key = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(strKey)
    End With

    Using Decryptor As ICryptoTransform = Algo.CreateDecryptor()
        Using MemStream As New MemoryStream(arrSaltAndCipherText.Skip(16).ToArray())
            Using CryptStream As New CryptoStream(MemStream, Decryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Read)
                Using Reader As New StreamReader(CryptStream)
                    AESDecryptBase64ToString = Reader.ReadToEnd()
                End Using
            End Using
        End Using
    End Using
End Function
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