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How can I convert a relative path to an absolute path in C on Unix? Is there a convenient system function for this?

On Windows there is a GetFullPathName function that does the job, but I didn't find something similar on Unix...

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1 Answer 1

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Use realpath().

The realpath() function shall derive, from the pathname pointed to by file_name, an absolute pathname that names the same file, whose resolution does not involve '.', '..', or symbolic links. The generated pathname shall be stored as a null-terminated string, up to a maximum of {PATH_MAX} bytes, in the buffer pointed to by resolved_name.

If resolved_name is a null pointer, the behavior of realpath() is implementation-defined.


The following example generates an absolute pathname for the file identified by the symlinkpath argument. The generated pathname is stored in the actualpath array.

#include <stdlib.h>
...
char *symlinkpath = "/tmp/symlink/file";
char actualpath [PATH_MAX+1];
char *ptr;


ptr = realpath(symlinkpath, actualpath);
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2  
The 'plus one' is not necessary, thuogh it won't do any harm. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 1 '08 at 0:59
1  
GetFullPathName on Windows works for non-existant files as well. realpath requires the path to exist. This kind of sucks when you want to create a path or file. –  Joakim May 3 '13 at 9:28

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