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Can any R experts provide a faster way to do the following? My code works, but it takes 1 minute to do a 30,000-[column] by 12-[row] data frame. Thanks!

    sync.columns = function(old.data, new.colnames)
    {
      # Given a data frame and a vector of column names,
      # makes a new data frame containing exactly the named
      # columns in the specified order; any that were not
      # present are filled in as columns of zeroes.

      if (length(new.colnames) == ncol(old.data) && 
          all(new.colnames == colnames(old.data)))
      {
        old.data    # nothing to do
      }
      else
      {
        m = matrix(nrow=nrow(old.data),ncol=length(new.colnames))

        for (t in 1:length(new.colnames))
        {
          if (new.colnames[t] %in% colnames(old.data))
          {
            m[,t] = old.data[,new.colnames[t]]   # copy column
          }
          else
          {
            m[,t] = rep(0,nrow(m))   # fill with zeroes
          }
        }
        result = as.data.frame(m)
        rownames(result) = rownames(old.data)
        colnames(result) = new.colnames
        result
      }
    }

Maybe something with cbind?

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1 Answer 1

This seems rather fast. First create a data.frame full of zeroes, then only replace what you can find in the old data:

sync.columns <- function(old.data, new.colnames) {
   M  <- nrow(old.data)
   N  <- length(new.colnames)
   rn <- rownames(old.data)
   cn <- new.colnames
   new.data <- as.data.frame(matrix(0, M, N, dimnames = list(rn, cn)))
   keep.col <- intersect(cn, colnames(old.data))
   new.data[keep.col] <- old.data[keep.col]
   new.data
}

M <- 30000
x <- data.frame(b = runif(M), i = runif(M), z = runif(M))
rownames(x) <- paste0("z", 1:M)
system.time(y <- sync.columns(x, letters[1:12]))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.031   0.010   0.043

head(y)
#    a          b c d e f g h         i j k l
# z1 0 0.27994248 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.3785181 0 0 0
# z2 0 0.75291520 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.7414294 0 0 0
# z3 0 0.07036461 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.1543653 0 0 0
# z4 0 0.40748957 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.5564374 0 0 0
# z5 0 0.98769595 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.4277466 0 0 0
# z6 0 0.82117781 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.2034743 0 0 0

Edit: following comments with the OP below, here is a matrix version:

sync.columns <- function(old.data, new.colnames) {
  M  <- nrow(old.data)
  N  <- length(new.colnames)
  rn <- rownames(old.data)
  cn <- new.colnames
  new.data <- matrix(0, M, N, dimnames = list(rn, cn))
  keep.col <- intersect(cn, colnames(old.data))
  new.data[, keep.col] <- old.data[, keep.col]
  new.data
}

x <- t(as.matrix(x)) # a wide matrix
system.time(y <- sync.columns(x, paste0("z", sample(1:50000, 30000))))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.049   0.002   0.051 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that gets it down to 25 seconds instead of 120 seconds, a distinct improvement. I was hoping for something like 1 or 2 seconds (comparable to doing read.csv on a data set of that size)... any other ideas? –  mc at uga dot edu Apr 7 '14 at 0:30
    
why 25 seconds? You see my example only took 40+ milliseconds. What else do we need to know? Maybe show us str(old.data). –  flodel Apr 7 '14 at 0:33
    
D'oh! Mine is not 12 wide x 30000 high, it is 30000 wide x 12 deep. Sorry about that. I've had several versions of the program and have turned the matrix around. Now that you've shown me your implementation, though, I'm tempted to turn it back around! (Which might not help, because then I'd need to sync rows rather than columns.) Is it generally the case that large numbers of rows work better than large numbers of columns? –  mc at uga dot edu Apr 7 '14 at 1:29
    
Many operations on data.frames are definitely faster on long data.frames rather than wide data.frames. That's because data.frames are essentially lists of vectors; An operator will typically loop (slow) on the columns/vectors to apply (fast) vectorized functions. So yes, I would recommend you use a long data.frame instead. Or if you can convert your data to a matrix, do so and long or wide will make no difference. –  flodel Apr 7 '14 at 1:40
    
Note that my original code is working on (creating) a matrix. Should I also convert the input data frame to a matrix? –  mc at uga dot edu Apr 7 '14 at 1:42

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