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If I google (7 - 12) mod 24 I get the answer 19.

When I do it C++ I get 4294967291

uint32_t hour = (7 - 12) % 24;
// hour = 4294967291

If I try an int32_t

int32_t hour = (7 - 12) % 24;
// hour = -5
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marked as duplicate by Qantas 94 Heavy, Jerry Coffin, Robert Harvey Apr 7 '14 at 2:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
When you convert singed to unsigned you add or subtract UMAX+1 to get a valid unsigned value. For example converting -1 to unsigned will always give you the max unsigned value for that type. –  Shafik Yaghmour Apr 7 '14 at 1:54
1  
In C++, / does truncation-towards-zero, so -5 / 24 == 0. % is defined such that (a/b)*b + a%b == a, therefore it must be -5. –  Matt McNabb Apr 7 '14 at 2:00
    
Don't mix signed and unsigned values. –  noobProgrammer Apr 7 '14 at 2:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

(7 - 12) % 24 is a signed expression, and assigning it to an unsigned int makes you see a different result

In C % is the remainder operation so (7 - 12) % 24 = -5

unsigned(-5) = 4294967291 since 4294967291 + 5 = 4294967296

While Google and Python uses the mathematics modulus operation, the result is 19. And 19 + 5 = 24

C,Python - different behaviour of the modulo (%) operation

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Saying 4294967291 + 5 = 4294967296 does not really explain why, you can see my answer to the question I linked above for the explanation. –  Shafik Yaghmour Apr 7 '14 at 2:09

7-12 ans an unsigned int (uint32) gives underflow.

See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operation for definition of the operator for negative numbers in respect to the programming language

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Makes sense. Why does the int32_t result not match Google? –  Joseph Malicke Apr 7 '14 at 1:52
    
@blindsamuel stackoverflow.com/questions/1082917/… –  Outlaw Lemur Apr 7 '14 at 1:53
5  
The result is not undefined. –  Robert Harvey Apr 7 '14 at 1:53
    
It's definitely defined: stackoverflow.com/questions/7221409/… –  Qantas 94 Heavy Apr 7 '14 at 1:55
1  
If you try to store an out-of-range value in unsigned int, it is adjusted modulo UINT_MAX+1 until it fits –  Matt McNabb Apr 7 '14 at 1:56

uint32_t is unsigned, meaning that it is restricted to positive numbers. It also means it has a larger range, since a signed byte can have values from -127 to 127, but an unsigned byte can have them from 0-255. When the unsigned int underflows, it will return a large number.

The reason that the int32_t is returning -5 instead of 19, is because in C++ and C# the modulus operator is actually remainder.

Also see this blog psot by Eric Lippert that sums this up amazingly. Specifically...

"The % operator does not give the canonical modulus, it gives the remainder. "

Meanwhile, google gives the canonical modulus since -123 mod 4 = 1, not -3, as it would be in C++ or C#.

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1  
So? ........... –  Robert Harvey Apr 7 '14 at 1:59
    
@RobertHarvey So remainder != modulus –  Outlaw Lemur Apr 7 '14 at 2:03
    
Thanks, but I don't see how this addresses the question at all. –  Robert Harvey Apr 7 '14 at 2:16
    
@RobertHarvey Check edits... I just didn't want to beat a dead horse with the whole unsigned/signed thing, but the actual operator still needed to be addressed. –  Outlaw Lemur Apr 7 '14 at 2:22
    
So far, nobody's provided a decent answer to the question anyway. I stated simply in my answer that a negative number can't be stuffed into an unsigned int without consequences, but apparently that's not specific enough. The right answer is to use the correct data type. –  Robert Harvey Apr 7 '14 at 2:25

The modulus operation actually has several different possible definitions producing various results for negative numbers. C++'s definition gives a negative result (-5) for the expression (7 - 12) % 24, and when you cast a negative value to an unsigned value you get that strange result. That value is the same as what you get if you were to do:

uint32_t x = 0;
x = x - 5;
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