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I've been trying to figure out how a Class can store and retrieve a Class pointer.(?)

I've got a finite state machine class from a library I import. When I want to change states I do this:

// Set up my State instance
void fooEntry();
void fooUpdate();
void fooExit();
// Instantiate State object
State fooState(fooEntry,fooUpdate,fooExit);
// Instantiate FSM object
FiniteStateMachine stateMachine = FiniteStateMachine(fooState);
// Transition to this State
statemachine.transitionTo(fooState);

And this was working well. I wanted certain State instances to do more things, including hold and return a State, So I added this:

class MyState: public State {
  public:
    MyState(void (*enterFunction)(), void (*updateFunction)(), void (*exitFunction)());
    // Save a State's address to a State pointer
    void setNextState(const State &state) {*followingState = state;} 
    State * nextState() { return followingState;} // Return pointer?
    // Lot's more not pertinent to this question.
  private:
    State * followingState;
};

I wanted to be able to do this:

// Set up and instantiate my MyState instance
void barEntry();
void barUpdate();
void barExit();
MyState barState(barEntry(),barUpdate(),barExit());
barState.setNextState(fooState); // Pass it the next State I want to go to
// then later...
statemachine.transitionTo(barState.nextState()); // retrieve the State.

When I try to compile this I get an error like this:

error: no matching function for call to 'FiniteStateMachine::transitionTo(State*)'
note: candidates are: FiniteStateMachine& FiniteStateMachine::transitionTo(State&)

This is from when I call statemachine.transitionTo(barState.nextState); I've tried every combination of & and * I can think of to get it to compile (much less work) until I was just guessing. I was hoping someone would point out my error and perhaps explain it to me.

I'm not sure if it matters as I'm just teaching myself C/C++ (20 years too late) but this is running on an arduino.


EDIT1

So after I made the change suggested by @deviantfan, the code compiled, but whenever I get to

barState.setNextState(fooState); 

The program has some sort of memory problem and jumps to another random part of my program, then crashes. This should just be calling:

void setNextState(const State &state) {*followingState = state;} 

So I'm not sure why my program goes crazy. But it's as likely as not, I've done something careless with arrays and/pointers elsewhere.


EDIT2

I found the cause of some of my problems (writing '\0' to a very wrong address), but it's still crashing when I try to use the object address returned from getFollowingState. What I have now:

class MyState: public State {
  public:
    MyState(void (*enterFunction)(), void (*updateFunction)(), void (*exitFunction)());
    // Save a State's address to a State pointer
    void setFollowingState(State &state) {followingState = &state;} // followingState should be a pointer to a State object.
    State * getFollowingState() { return followingState;} // Return pointer?
    // Lot's more not pertinent to this question.
  private:
    State * followingState; // a pointer to a state object.
};

To use this, I do:

// Set up and instantiate my MyState instance
void barEntry();    void barUpdate();    void barExit();
MyState barState(barEntry(),barUpdate(),barExit());
barState.setFollowingState(fooState); // Pass it the next State I want to go to
statemachine.transitionTo(barState);
// then later within one of fooState's functions, 
statemachine.transitionTo(*barState.getFollowingtState()); // retrieve the State.
share|improve this question
1  
statemachine.transitionTo(*barState.nextState()); And if you´re new to C++ now, learn it properly with all modern features from the beginning. Raw pointers at completely different places to the same thing are (at least in my opinion) not plain evil, but if you are confused with your own code, nothing good will come out of it. –  deviantfan Apr 7 at 2:26
1  
If you do want to have pointers in two different places pointing to the same thing, you want to use a reference counted shared pointer, or in the case of C++, std::shared_ptr<T>. There are some subtle errors in you code, because for example you do this: FiniteStateMachine stateMachine = FiniteStateMachine(fooState); When you should just do this: FiniteStateMachine stateMachine(fooState); –  noobProgrammer Apr 7 at 2:43
    
Thanks @deviantfan, It makes sense to me now. I wan't expecting to do much C++ since it's an arduino, but some of the OO benefits are nice. –  RyanN Apr 7 at 12:35
    
@noobProgrammer, thanks for the tips. I looked into shared_ptr and I don't think the AVR compiler supports the required STL. I've only got 8K of RAM to work with! As for your second point, I thought assignment vs. initialization was just semantics, but it does seem like a better way to instantiate a class. If it makes it any better, I instantiate all the objects at run time and they never go away. –  RyanN Apr 7 at 12:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This line probably isn't doing what you expect:

void setNextState(const State &state) {*followingState = state;} 

When you write *followingState, you're dereferencing the pointer. That means it's accessing the object being pointed-to, rather than the pointer itself. As a result, that function isn't copying the address of state. Rather, it's trying to make a whole new copy of its contents, and put it into whatever is pointed-to by followingState.

That's a problem because it looks like followingState isn't actually pointing to anything -- it's presumably a null or wild (invalid) pointer. That means your function ends up copying data to some arbitrary location in memory, which results in undefined behaviour.

Instead, you want to copy the address of state instead of its contents, like this:

void setNextState(const State &state) { followingState = &state; }

In order to do that though, you'll need to change your declaration of followingState to const State * followingState;. The const in this case means the pointer can be reassigned to a different object, but the object being pointed-to can't be modified.

If you want to be able to modify the state then you'll need to remove the const from your setNextState() parameter list.

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