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Okay, so I'm creating an Android program with multiple threads. Now, when I'm in the second thread and want to interact with 'things' in the first, I need to use the following code:

new Handler().post(new Runnable() {
      @Override
      public void run() {
          // do stuff
      }
});

Within this block, I need to access variables from 'outside'. For example, I have a double[10] that I declare and initially set to 0, then run a loop which updates each entry on each iteration. However, in order to refer to this variable within the above block, it needs to be final. At the moment I'm doing the following:

final double[] b = buckets;

But surely there must be a more efficient method then having to use twice as much memory, just to make the variable final?

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1  
Maybe use syncronized setters? –  ifLoop Apr 7 at 6:57
    
use public synchronized double getB(){return b;} –  VenomVendor Apr 7 at 7:00
    
I've never come across synchronized before. I just tried to use it, but as my declaration of buckets is within a method (it's not a public variable) I'm not quite sure how... –  Keir Simmons Apr 7 at 7:07

2 Answers 2

You not use twice memory, only use a 8 bytes more, the pointer to array.

If you have a double[] buckets = new double[10]; you have 8 byte of pointer and 10*8 bytes of doubles. When you make final double[] b = buckets; only create a new pointer, but the array is the same.

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When you write

final double[] b = buckets;

You are declaring a new variable that holds a reference to the existing data. The data is not copied.

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