Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When one is programming in an imperative programming languages such as Java one can conveniently add trace statements. For example:

for (int i=0; i<10; i++) {
  // do something
  // do something
  System.out.println("Some trace statement");
  // do something 
}

How does one accomplish this in a LISP dialect such as Clojure - for example say I wanted to add a trace just before recur:

(def fact
  (fn [n]
    (loop [cnt n acc 1]
       (if (zero? cnt)
            acc
          ;; say I want to add a trace here
          (recur (dec cnt) (* acc cnt))))))

Notes:

  1. The method should be relatively as simple as adding a line
  2. For example if I were to use a do block -- I have to reformat, make sure I close the brackets appropriately
share|improve this question
1  
So you don't want to use do because of reformatting? What editor are you using? –  Chiron Apr 7 at 8:38
    
@Chiron, my point is that I know how to solve this issue using a do -- however I always feel it is more trouble than I'd like -- I did a lot of LISP in my youth but I've never found a convenient way to be able to add trace statements to my code. –  user1172468 Apr 7 at 8:43
2  
@NielsK That is not a valid argument. What about: "I don't want to add if condition to my Java code because I don't want to reformat my code" ? –  Chiron Apr 7 at 11:36
2  
@C.WarrenDale I edited my answer so that Paredit stands out a little more –  coredump Apr 7 at 20:49
2  
@coredump Thanks! I didn't notice until after I'd made the comment, and I forgot to edit it because I am a poor netizen ;) –  C. Warren Dale Apr 7 at 20:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Non-invasive tracing

Lisp environments generally provide interactive debugging environment and trace mechanisms. For example, in SBCL, you could use the trace macro: you don't even need to modify your code, like you did in your Java example.

For Clojure, look at the tools.trace library, or the following answer: clojure: adding a debug trace to every function in a namespace?

Custom functions and macros

See also the many answers to this question: Debugging in Clojure? Most of them involve nesting the expression you want to debug/trace inside another expression, like Chiron suggested.

I don't think that "I have to reformat and close the brackets appropriately" is a good argument; everytime you edit your program you have to deal with the syntax, or else you won't ever modify your code.

Paredit

I personally don't use it, but have a look at Paredit if you want to let your IDE keep track of parens and brackets.

Reader macros

I you really don't want to nest your expression inside another one, I suppose you could write a reader macro so that you could annotate an expression with a debug statement, but this is overkill, imho (edit: this is what spyscope does, apparently; see NielsK's answer).

share|improve this answer
2  
TRACE is a macro, not a function. –  Rainer Joswig Apr 7 at 8:50
    
@RainerJoswig indeed, thanks –  coredump Apr 7 at 8:53

The Spyscope library provides a simple option for putting in trace prints without having to change the original syntax, just in the way you (and many others) prefer.

spyscope.repl=> (take 20 (repeat #spy/p (+ 1 2 3)))
6
(6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6) 

There's also ways of including trace messages

spyscope.repl=> #spy/d ^{:marker "triple-add"} (+ 1 2 3)
spyscope.repl$eval3935.invoke(NO_SOURCE_FILE:1) triple-add (+ 1 2 3) => 6
6

and even (partial) stack traces

spyscope.repl=> (take 20 (repeat #spy/d ^{:fs 3} (+ 1 2 3)))
----------------------------------------
clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6477)
clojure.lang.Compiler.eval(Compiler.java:6511)
spyscope.repl$eval675.invoke(REPL:13) (+ 1 2 3) => 6
(6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6)
share|improve this answer

Use do block:

(def fact
(fn [n]
(loop [cnt n acc 1]
   (if (zero? cnt)
        acc
      (do
        (println "**")
        (recur (dec cnt) (* acc cnt)))))))

user=> (fact 4)
**
**
**
**
24

In your REPL:

(doc do)

do (do exprs*)
Special Form
Evaluates the expressions in order and returns the value of the last. If no expressions are supplied, returns nil. Please see http://clojure.org/special_forms#do

share|improve this answer
    
Thank your for your Answer however I was looking for a more convenient form than adding a do block -- I'll update my question –  user1172468 Apr 7 at 8:21
1  
For possible viewers. Original question didn't mention that the OP doesn't want to use do block. It was updated later. –  Chiron Apr 7 at 8:47

I have several macros that allow something like this (because it is handy not having to toss in a progn many times):

(my-trace ("hi mom" 1 2 3) recur (dec cnt) (* acc cnt))

my-trace simply expands into:

(progn (imperative-trace "hi mom" 1 2 3) (recur (dec cnt) (* acc cnt)))

a simpler variant is:

(echo hi-mom recur (dec cnt) (* acc cnt))

which captures the result of the wrapped form and prints it tagged with hi-mom.

A nicety is that I can insert/remove nil as the unevaluated first parameter to turn tracing off/on. On some debug out put I just leave the trace in place but disabled until the next time I need it.

-hk

share|improve this answer
    
What language is that? progn looks like Common Lisp. recur looks like Clojure. –  Mars Apr 10 at 3:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.