Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What do I mean by this? Easiest to show via code

import java.util.Date;

public class Example {

  public static void main(String... args) {
    Date d1 = new Date(2014,4,7);
    Date d2 = new Date(2014,4,7);

    methodA(d1);
    System.out.println("Month of d1: " +d1.getMonth());

    d2 = methodB(d2);
    System.out.println("Month of d2: " +d2.getMonth());
  }

  public static void methodA(Date d) {
    d.setMonth(6);
  }

  public static Date methodB(Date d) {
    d.setMonth(6);
    return d;
  }

}

First off ignore the deprecated Date code. When talking about mutable objects such as Date is it better to make the change and return the reference as in methodB or is it ok to use methodA's approach?

I suspect methodB is what most people would choose but why?

Note methodA only has the same result as methodB when using mutable objects. Swap the dates for an Integer for example and the value would remain unchanged for the first object after methodA had been called (assuming methodA and methodB would both do a simple increment on two Integer references of the same value)

share|improve this question
    
i wouldn't say that methodB is what most people choose. in some cases it is necessary to use methodB, in other cases it doesn't matter –  mangusta Apr 7 at 8:18
2  
Wow, a question with 0 upvotes and 7 answers with 0 upvotes.. gotta be some sort of record! –  Paul Hicks Apr 7 at 8:23
    
Still tossing up between upvoting and flagging as primarily opinion-based.. cannot decide, arg! –  Paul Hicks Apr 7 at 8:27
    
@PaulHicks Most of the answers seem to be doing a good job of explaining why the different signatures exist. I think the question is phrased in an opinion-based way, but the answerers have been objective. –  Duncan Apr 7 at 8:33
    
I agree. 15char –  Paul Hicks Apr 7 at 8:49

6 Answers 6

I prefer methodA because it is clear that you will be modifying the argument I supply.

I find methodB misleading in its current form, because I would assume the argument is not going to be modified, when it actually will be. You could always edit the code to remove this misleading behaviour:

public static Date methodB(Date d) {
  Date result = d.clone();
  result.setMonth(6);
  return result;
}

To some extent, methodB allows for method chaining, however it is uncommon for the returned object to be the argument itself. More often, the returned object is the same class you invoked the method on:

public class DateManipulator {

  public DateManipulator(Date d) {
    // store d
  }

  public static DateManipulator methodB() {
    d.setMonth(6);
    return this;
  }

  public static Date build() {
    return d;
  }
}

Which allows for the construct:

new DateManipulator(d).methodB().methodC()....build();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, and if methodB were modified as you suggested, would methodA still be your preference? –  Paul Statham Apr 7 at 8:54
    
@PaulStatham I would personally opt for methodA, since it would leave the challenge of cloning (or whatever) to the caller. In many cases, they won't need to retain the previous object state. –  Duncan Apr 7 at 8:59

Most people would favor option 2 because it enables chaining:

Example.methodB(...).someThing()

However, favoring this should be avoided at all cost if there is some other information that can be returned by the method (a common example is returning a boolean that indicates success or failure of the method).

Common example is the StringBuilder class. StringBuilder.append() returns a StringBuilder (this), so you can chain append() commands.

Note that this method usually is used on the invoking object (like the StringBuilder example), but the argument variant is perfectly fine as well.

share|improve this answer

In general I'd prefer methodA, since I'd consider returning another object as implying that the original is not modified. All the String processing methods are examples.

However, there are certain special cases, for instance the builder pattern, where how methodB works is clear and you get the advantage that you can chain the calls. Consumers can probably be expected to know the builder pattern, and therefore methodB is not misleading in this case.

share|improve this answer

It is neither better nor worse. It depends on the situation.

For example, as a fan of method chaining, I would rarely use either of those. I'd prefer

public Example methodC(Date d) {
  d.setMonth(6);
  return this;
}

Though methods with side-effects like this (and I'd consider changing a property of a passed-in parameter to be a side-effect, in most cases) should be avoided, most of the time.

share|improve this answer

I guess there is a silent convention that you don't really change method parameter like that in Java. There are exceptions to this, like Collections.sort method etc. In Ruby it's a nice custom that methods that change parameters are marked with exclamation mark (!). But no, Integer and String parameter changes do not affect values outside the method scope. As far as I know, they have objects in pool of Integers/Strings.

share|improve this answer

"I suspect methodB is what most people would choose but why?"

not really, methodA updates field month in object d1,same as method methodB will do, and as method methodB returns passed object, return statement is redundant

which means most people actually go with methodA

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.