Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to use the initialization list of a child class' constructor to initialize data members declared as protected in the parent class? I can't get it to work. I can work around it, but it would be nice if I didn't have to.

Some sample code:

class Parent
{
protected:
    std::string something;
};

class Child : public Parent
{
private:
    Child() : something("Hello, World!")
    {
    }
};

When I try this, the compiler tells me: "class 'Child' does not have any field named 'something'". Is something like this possible? If so, what is the syntax?

Many thanks!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 58 down vote accepted

It is not possible in the way you describe. You'll have to add a constructor (could be protected) to the base class to forward it along. Something like:

class Parent
{
protected:
    Parent( const std::string& something ) : something( something )
    {}

    std::string something;
}

class Child : public Parent
{
private:
    Child() : Parent("Hello, World!")
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is exactly the workaround I'd already come up with. At least now I don't have to worry about whether or not it can be done. :) –  Stephen Feb 18 '10 at 17:47

When the compiler comes across the initializer list, the derived class object is yet to be formed. The base class constructor has not been called till then. Only after the base class constructor has been called, something comes to being. Hence the problem. When you do not call the base class constructor explicitly, the compiler does that for you (by generating the appropriate trivial constructor for the base class). This causes the something member to be default initialized.

From C++0x draft:

12.6.2 Initializing bases and members

2 Names in a mem-initializer-id are looked up in the scope of the constructor’s class and, if not found in that scope, are looked up in the scope containing the constructor’s definition. [ Note: if the constructor’s class contains a member with the same name as a direct or virtual base class of the class, a mem-initializer-id naming the member or base class and composed of a single identifier refers to the class member. A meminitializer- id for the hidden base class may be specified using a qualified name. —end note ] Unless the mem-initializer-id names the constructor’s class, a non-static data member of the constructor’s class or a direct or virtual base of that class, the mem-initializer is ill-formed.

Note: Emphasis mine.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for pointing me at the "why". Makes total sense. I've been away from C++ for too long... :) –  Stephen Feb 18 '10 at 17:48

You can't initialize members of the parent class in the derived class constructor initialization list. It doesn't matter wherther they are protected, public or anything else.

In your example, member something is member of Parent class, which means that it can only be initialized in the constructor initializer list of Parent class.

share|improve this answer

I came across a similar problem and This was my work around

class Parent

{
protected:
    std::string something;
};

class Child : public Parent
{
private:
    Child()
    {
       something="Hello, World!";
    }
};

Is there any problem with the above approach

share|improve this answer
    
hmm ... answer or question? –  kleopatra Sep 4 '13 at 7:29
    
It this is a question, please, ask in another thread. –  Alma Do Sep 4 '13 at 7:40
    
That is certainly a valid workaround, but it is not an answer to the original question, which was to use the initialization list. –  Stephen Sep 17 '13 at 16:46
    
I see, thanks for the comments. –  Neha Kumari Oct 2 '13 at 16:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.