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I am using fork to create the child process. Now I want to know the name and process id of the child process using putty. Which command I need to use to get this information. I am trying with ps and pstree. how can give the name of the child process while creating new child process? Is it possible to get this information using any linux/unix command?

I want to know how much time child is active and when it is terminated. mean timing information of child process.

root@mx6q:~# ps aux|grep "childprogram"
ps: invalid option -- 'a'
BusyBox v1.20.2 (2014-03-13 11:47:37 CET) multi-call binary.

Usage: ps

Show list of processes

        w       Wide output
        l       Long output
        T       Show threads

root@mx6q:~#



root@mx6q:~# ps | grep "childprogram"
 1407 root      1908 S    grep childprogram
root@mx6q:~# ps | grep "childprogram"
 1409 root      1908 S    grep childprogram
root@mx6q:~# ps | grep "childprogram"
 1411 root      1908 S    grep childprogram

For Parent:

root@mx6q:~# readlink /proc/670/exe
.asoundrc                   .gvfs/
.bashrc                     adit-30-09-2014.vnclicense
.gstreamer-0.10/            enable_usb_dr_host_mode.sh
root@mx6q:~# readlink /proc/670/exe

but I am not able to find child pid inside /proc/? What does it mean?

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Try ps aux|grep "childprogram" –  Mantosh Kumar Apr 7 at 9:46
    
root@mx6q:~# ps aux|grep "childprogram" ps: invalid option -- 'a' BusyBox v1.20.2 (2014-03-13 11:47:37 CET) multi-call binary. Usage: ps Show list of processes w Wide output l Long output T Show threads root@mx6q:~# –  kapilddit Apr 7 at 9:55
    
@Mantosh Is this correct way or I am doing something wrong... ?? –  kapilddit Apr 7 at 9:56
    
I tried: root@mx6q:~# ps | grep "childprogram" 1407 root 1908 S grep childprogram root@mx6q:~# ps | grep "childprogram" 1409 root 1908 S grep childprogram root@mx6q:~# ps | grep "childprogram" 1411 root 1908 S grep childprogram –  kapilddit Apr 7 at 10:01
1  
See uofr.net/~greg/processname.html –  John Zwinck Apr 7 at 10:19

2 Answers 2

You tagged this as C and mentioned that you are the actor forking the new process so you have all this information available to you in the parent process that forks the child but you need to alter your code to capture it.

  • You have the child's pid because it is returned in the parent by fork.

  • You (probably) have the child's name because under most circumstances you are the one who wrote the exec call. If not, with the child's pid you can readlink /proc/<pid>/exe.

  • If you need to know the child's stats while it is running you can call getrusage with the RUSAGE_CHILDREN option.

  • If you just want the child's stat's after it is completed you can wait on it with wait4
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I am doing all these exercise because I am getting -1 return value from waitpid always with ECHILD errorno. Is there any way to debug why it is failing? I tried both these: //pid_t returnValue = waitpid(Checksum_pid, &childStatus, 0); //pid_t returnValue = waitpid(Checksum_pid, &childStatus, WNOHANG); –  kapilddit Apr 7 at 14:32
    
I used readlink /proc/pid/exe but I am not able to find child pid in the list. what does it mean. parent pid is available? I have update the same in my question. –  kapilddit Apr 7 at 14:40
    
Those calls look ok in and of themselves which suggests you have a bug somewhere in the surrounding context. You should slice down the code to the minimal required example and submit another question. It's probably something simple but it is impossible to tell from just this. –  Duck Apr 7 at 15:09
1  
Did you set SIGCHLD to SIG_IGN? –  Duck Apr 7 at 15:33
    
No, How can I do that? I don't know about it. can you please give me reference for sample implementation? –  kapilddit Apr 7 at 17:48

Try this:

$ ps xf

And analyze the output and make some filters with grep sed and/or awk.

I am not very much familiar with BusyBox as I know it is a tiny distro with limited functions.

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I tried but not working. –  kapilddit Apr 7 at 14:33
    
-1. BusyBox is not a "tiny distro". It's a multi-call library implementing many of the standard POSIX tools. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar May 2 at 18:22

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