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I have tried the following:

private void Form1_KeyDown(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if((Keys) e.KeyValue == Keys.Escape) 
        this.Close();
}

...doesn't work.

Then I tried this:

protected override void OnKeyDown(KeyEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnKeyDown(e);
    if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Escape)
        this.Close();
}

..still nothing's working.

The KeyPreview on my windows form properties is set to true...what am I doing wrong?

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1  
Have you tried setting a breakpoint in those methods? Is the event handler even firing? –  Steve Danner Feb 18 '10 at 18:08
1  
Don't name your cancel button like the form property 'CancelButton'. Otherwise it seems that you can't set the CancelButton. –  Jonas Middendorf Aug 18 '11 at 8:42
    
@SteveDanner, event doesn't get triggered. probably declaration in InitializeComponent() is missing. –  InfantPro'Aravind' Oct 12 '11 at 14:28
    
I think that the reason it doesn't work is beacause that other controls inside the form got the focus... –  itsho Apr 4 '12 at 12:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 93 down vote accepted

This will always work, regardless of proper event handler assignment, KeyPreview, CancelButton etc:

    protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData) {
        if (keyData == Keys.Escape) {
            this.Close();
            return true;
        }
        return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
    }
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4  
thank you much! this was EXACTLY what i was looking for!!! –  yeahumok Feb 19 '10 at 15:26
3  
worked like a charm –  Jared Updike Apr 5 '10 at 15:13
4  
-1, using of Form's CancelButton property is the correct way. –  ABCD Feb 6 '13 at 12:05
6  
Ugh, the 1980s called, they want their dialog box back. –  Hans Passant Feb 6 '13 at 12:39
    
You can also return true from ProcessCmdKey to signal that the key is handled, hence preventing the "ding" noise. –  Spooky Jun 3 '13 at 18:50

You should just be able to set the Form's CancelButton property to your Cancel button and then you won't need any code.

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I did that but it's not fired when I press esc, why? –  Mihai Bratulescu May 20 at 13:57

Assuming that you have a "Cancel" button, setting the form's CancelButton property (either in the designer or in code) should take care of this automatically. Just place the code to close in the Click event of the button.

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By Escape button do you mean Escape key? Judging by your code I think thats what you want. You could also try Application.Exit(), but Close should work. Do you have a worker thread? If a non background thread is running this could keep the application open.

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Any comments from the downvoter? –  SwDevMan81 Feb 18 '10 at 18:14

The accepted answer indeed is correct, and I've used that approach several times. Suddenly, it would not work anymore, so I found it strange. Mostly because my breakpoint would not be hit for ESC key, but it would hit for other keys.

After debugging I found out that one of the controls from my form was overriding ProcessCmdKey method, with this code:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData)
{
    // ...
    if (keyData == (Keys.Escape))
    {
        Close();
        return true;
    }
    return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
}

... and this was preventing my form from getting the ESC key (notice the return true). So make sure that no child controls are taking over your input.

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