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What's going on here? What is the subtle difference between the two forms of "unless"?

> irb(main):001:0> foo = true unless defined?(foo)
=> nil 
irb(main):002:0> unless defined?(fooo) ; fooo = false ; end
=> false 

thx

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What version of Ruby are you using? –  bta Feb 18 '10 at 20:56
1  
With all this talk of assigning variables unless they're already defined, I feel compelled to point out that foo ||= true accomplishes the same thing (and always returns true). –  Alison R. Feb 18 '10 at 22:10
1  
@Allison R. Not if foo is defined but false. –  FMc Feb 18 '10 at 22:43
4  
Instead of using a vague title such as "What's going on here in ruby?", I'd recommend you use a more descriptive one. At the very least, you should include the word "unless" in the title. This way if someone runs into the same problem, they can know that this question might be related based on the question's title. –  Senseful Feb 18 '10 at 23:37
    
The nicer way to do this with in one line is defined?(foo) or foo = true. –  Andrew Marshall May 10 '12 at 1:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Apparently, ruby creates local variable at parse time setting them to nilso it is defined and this is done whether the code is executed or not.

When the code is evaluated at your first line, it doesn't execute the assignment part since foo is set to nil. In the second line, because fooo has not been parsed yet, defined?returns nil letting the code inside the block execute and assign fooo.

As an example you can try this:

if false  
  foo = 43  
end  
defined? foo  
=> "local-variable"

This is taken from a forum post at ruby-forum.

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Excellent example - should have thought about simplifying the problem further to the one you showed. Thanks. –  farhadf Feb 22 '10 at 17:52
    
good explanation of complex behaviour –  William Denniss Mar 14 '11 at 15:52

Let's start with something simpler:

# z is not yet defined
irb(main):001:0> defined?(z)
=> nil

# Even though the assignment won't execute,
# the mere presence of the assignment statement
# causes z to come to life.
irb(main):002:0> z = 123 if false
=> nil
irb(main):003:0> defined?(z)
=> "local-variable"
irb(main):004:0> z
=> nil

Now we can figure out your first example.

foo = true unless defined?(foo)

Is foo defined? Before we press ENTER in irb, no. However, the presence of the assignment statement causes foo to come to life. That means the assignment statement won't be executed, leaving foo in existence but having nil as its value. And what is the last expression evaluated in the irb line? It is unless defined?(foo), which evaluates to nil.

For more info on how assignments (even those that do not get executed) cause variables to exist, see this discussion of Variable/Method Ambiguity.

In your second example, there is nothing mysterious at all: fooo is not defined, so the code in the block executes, setting fooo to false. That assignment is the last expression evaluated, so false is the return value of our block.

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irb(main)> foo = true unless defined?(Integer)
=> nil 
irb(main)> foo = true unless defined?(thisIsUndefined)
=> true

Your first block is returning nil because the way it's written leaves 2 options:

  • foo is not defined --> assign true
  • foo is defined --> do nothing

Here, foo must be defined when the line is evaluated. Thus, nothing happens and nil is returned.

irb(main)> unless defined?(Integer) ; fooo = false ; end
=> nil
irb(main)> unless defined?(thisIsUndefined) ; fooo = false ; end
=> false 

Your second block operates the same way your first one does. If fooo is not defined, the block is entered and fooo is set to false. The result of the last line of the block is the return value of the block, thus the false you are seeing. If fooo does exist, then the block is skipped over and nothing happens, therefore there is nothing to return, therefore the nil.

Based on your code, I would say that foo was defined when this code was run and fooo was not (test code shown was generated in Ruby 1.8.6). If you did not define either of these before running this code, then you may have something called foo that is defined by default (do defined?(foo) by itself to check). Try using a different name and see if you get the same results.

Edit:

irb(main)> defined?(bar)
=> nil
irb(main)> bar = true unless defined?(bar)
=> nil
irb(main)> defined?(bar)
=> "local-variable"

Apparently, defined?() is returning true since it has already seen bar (at the beginning of the line), even though you are still in the process of defining it.

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in the first instance you call foo into existence in the assignment statement. Maybe this will clarify:

bar = if true
         puts bar.class
      else
         puts "not reached"
      end
NilClass
=> nil

baz = if true
         puts baz.class
         42
      else
         puts "not reached"
      end
NilClass
=> 42
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August, all look fine in 1.8.7:

$ irb
irb(main):001:0> unless defined?(fooo); fooo = true; end
=> true
irb(main):002:0> fooo
=> true
irb(main):003:0> `ruby --version`
=> "ruby 1.8.7 (2008-06-20 patchlevel 22) [i486-linux]\n"
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Well.. One form is a block and one form isn't. The second part, the block, returns the last statement evaluated. The first one.. Hrm.. I don't know exactly what it's doing.

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-1 This doesn't involve blocks. –  Andrew Grimm Dec 22 '10 at 7:19

In Ruby 1.8.7:

foo = true unless defined?(foo)
p foo # => nil

unless defined?(fooo); fooo = true; end
p foo # => nil

I don't have an explanation for the behaviour you are seeing.

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fooo (as opposed to foo) is true. –  Andrew Grimm Dec 22 '10 at 7:20

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