Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write an Spring.NET + NHibernate Interceptor that keeps a record of the transactions that occur. I managed to get this working in the Northwind example project without too many issues. I'm now trying to incorporate that Interceptor into a larger company project and I'm having some issues. There are two major changes that are taking place:

  1. I'm writing the changes to a Repository of NHibernate Dao objects.
  2. I'm trying to retrieve the repository using Spring.Net's dependency injection.

I wrote a simple (experimental) unit test for this functionality and I am confident that (1) has been accomplished. My Unit test inherets from an internal base class that was written for Spring.Net unit tests and is properly assigned a repository upon running the test. When I pass in the Unit Tests's repository for the objects that the interceptor will write to the system works well. However, I am trying to have spring give the interceptor it's own repository and it doesn't seem to be working.

Here is the top of the interceptor (I've replaced all instances of the company/project name with WORK.)

namespace WORK.Data.NHibernate
{
    public class LoggingInterceptor : EmptyInterceptor
    {
        private IRepository<EntityAuditLog> _entityAuditLogRepo;
        public IRepository<EntityAuditLog> EntityAuditLogRepository
        {
            set { _entityAuditLogRepo = value; }
        }

My spring.xml has the following entry for the interceptor:

  <object id="LoggingInterceptor" type="WORK.Data.NHibernate.LoggingInterceptor, WORK.Data.NHibernate">
    <property name="EntityAuditLogRepository" ref="EntityAuditLogDao"/>
  </object>
  <!-- Transaction Management Strategy - local database transactions -->
  <object id="transactionManager"
        type="Spring.Data.NHibernate.HibernateTransactionManager, Spring.Data.NHibernate33">

    <property name="DbProvider" ref="DbProvider"/>
    <property name="SessionFactory" ref="NHibernateSessionFactory"/>
    <property name="EntityInterceptor" ref="LoggingInterceptor"/>

  </object>

Before I had just a simple object declaration for the LoggingInterceptor above the transactionManager and then another LoggingInterceptor object definition later in the code that included the property. I suspected that the double definition may have been the problem so I consolidated the two.

<object id="EntityAuditLogDao" type="WORK.Data.NHibernate.NHRepository&lt;WORK.Entities.EntityAuditLog>, WORK.Data.NHibernate, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=|token|">
<property name="SessionFactory" ref="NHibernateSessionFactory"/>

That's the definition for EntityAuditLogDao (the objects that the Interceptor is meant to store the changes in).

Below is the test definition:

[TestClass]
public class LoggingInterceptorTest : AbstractSpringDaoIntegrationTest
{
    private IRepository<EntityAuditLog> _entityAuditLogRepo;

    private ISessionFactory _sessionFactory;

    public IRepository<EntityAuditLog> EntityAuditLogDao
    {
        set { _entityAuditLogRepo = value; }
    }

    public ISessionFactory SessionFactory
    {
        set { _sessionFactory = value; }
    }

    private IApplicationContext _ctx;

    [TestInitialize]
    public void SetUp()
    {
        _ctx = ContextRegistry.GetContext();
    }
    [TestMethod]
    public void OnLoadTest()
    {
        //LoggingInterceptor logger = _ctx["LoggingInterceptor"] as LoggingInterceptor;
        //Assert.IsNotNull(logger);
        LoggingInterceptor logger = new LoggingInterceptor();
        int beforeCount = _entityAuditLogRepo.All().Count();
        logger.OnFlushDirty(null,null,new string[]{"a","b","c"}, new string[]{"a","d","c"}, new string[]{"first","second","third"}, null);
        int afterCount = _entityAuditLogRepo.All().Count();
        Assert.AreEqual(afterCount, beforeCount + 1);
        EntityAuditLog recentEntry = _entityAuditLogRepo.All().Last();
        Assert.AreEqual(recentEntry.OldValues, "<second>b</second>");
        Assert.AreEqual(recentEntry.NewValues, "<second>d</second>");
    }
}

The test gets its properties filled out properly.

I don't really know what I'm missing. What would need to change for LoggingInterceptor to be recognized by spring and have its properties injected? I opened up the log that was generated in BareTail and there was no mention of LoggingInterceptor. When I tried to reference it with _ctx["LoggingInterceptor"] (as suggested by my lead dev) it gave me a Spring.Objects.Factory.NoSuchObjectDefinitionException.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

share|improve this question

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.