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So I am new to regex.... and what I can't make sense of is this...

How can I search for a specific regex each time in a string, ie match all occurences of 'test' in a given string.... What could I use as a logical parantheses?

/(test)*/

This returns several matches/Backreferences and doesn't seem to be meant for logically grouping/order of execution.

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I don't understand what you're asking for. Can you give an example where this would be useful? –  wallyk Feb 18 '10 at 20:14
    
Its not very clear what kind of result you want. Can you post a sample input string and desired output? –  Juliet Feb 18 '10 at 20:15
    
Are you trying to grab all instances of the word 'test' in string so you can replace them with something else? Can you elaborate on your goal a bit more? –  Levi Hackwith Feb 18 '10 at 20:15
    
I'm just trying to match the word test in any given string. BUT, my example didn't quite make sense because of my limited understanding of regex, so I will update with a different example. –  Zombies Feb 18 '10 at 20:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To stop parenthesis from creating match groups, start them with ?:

/(?:test)*/

This just matches "test" several times in a row, without saving the matched substrings anywhere.

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Let me ask this, is there a need for (?: <regex> ) often, in the effect of a logical parentheses? –  Zombies Feb 18 '10 at 20:40
    
It is worth noting that this construct is specific to Perl (and PCRE-related systems, which most languages can be). Doesn't work in grep, awk, and other POSIX-style regular expression environments. –  Michael Ekstrand Feb 18 '10 at 20:40

Your regex specifies only contiguous occurences of test. For all, you usually need to us a flag to indicate that you wnt to match every occurence, not just the first. In most languages, this is indicated by using the 'g' flag.

/test/g 
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I am so new to this, thanks.... also, knowing is half the battle. –  Zombies Feb 18 '10 at 20:41

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