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here is new file named "file".

$cat file
the first line
the second line
the third line

and here is another file "test.hs".

text :: String -> IO ( )
text fileName = do
                source <- readFile fileName
                putStrLn ( source )

then I can get the content of "file" by typing

$ghci test.hs
*Main> text "file"

now I have to change the content of "file" to "test.hs"

file :: String
file = "the first line\nthe second line\nthe third line"

Is there any way to write like this?

file :: String
file = "the first line
        the second line
        the third line"

error

factor.hs:58:33:
    lexical error in string/character literal at character '\n'
Failed, modules loaded: none.
share|improve this question
    
Assuming there was a way, would it not add whitespace to achieve the indentation? –  Jonathan Fischoff Apr 7 at 17:19
    
@JonathanFischoff See my answer. –  Nikita Volkov Apr 7 at 19:21

5 Answers 5

You can write multiline strings like so

x = "This is some text which we escape \
      \   and unescape to keep writing"

Which prints as

"This is some text which we escape   and unescape to keep writing"

If you want this to print as two lines

x = "This is some text which we escape \n\
      \   and unescape to keep writing"

Which prints as

This is some text which we escape
    and unescape to keep writing
share|improve this answer

In Haskell you can type multiline strings by ending it with a anti-slash and beginning the newline with another "\", just like so :

file :: String
file = "the first line\n\  
    \the second line\n\  
    \the third line\n"  

Hope this helps

EDIT : added '\n' characters at the end of the lines.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not add newline like the OP wants –  Jonathan Fischoff Apr 8 at 16:16
    
You'll need to explicitly add the newline escape character for this to work. As you've written it this will not work. –  Varun Madiath Apr 8 at 19:53
    
Yeah of course, sorry. I was more focused on showing you to add multiple-line strings in Haskell that I forgot to write the '\n'. Fixed now. Thanks. –  nschoe Apr 10 at 5:02

I don't believe that Haskell has an easy way to do this without resorting to quasiquoting or something else. However you can mostly get what you want by using the unlines function like below. However this will result in a newline after your last line, which you may or may not care about.

file :: String
file = unlines [
    "the first line",
    "the second line",
    "the third line"
    ]
share|improve this answer
    
This has a runtime cost, which isn't the case with literals like in my or nschoe's answer –  jozefg Apr 7 at 17:22
    
Yeah, I'm aware of that. I did just read to core hoping that GHC would optimize away that call, but no such luck. I have seen this pattern in a few places though. –  Varun Madiath Apr 7 at 17:39
    
FWIW, I would say this is the most common pattern. –  Jonathan Fischoff Apr 7 at 22:12
    
+1: This is probably the canonical solution. Template Haskell solves the runtime cost if said cost is even a problem in the first place. Use intercalate "\n" instead of unlines if you do not want the trailing newline. –  Thomas Eding Apr 8 at 19:09
    
If you're using intercalate like Thomas Eding suggests, just remember to import Data.List. I'm guessing the requirement of the import is why I've seen unlines used more often than intercalate. –  Varun Madiath Apr 8 at 19:52

Many times this facality is referred to as heredocs. Haskell does not have heredocs.

However, there are several packages that use GHC's QuasiQuotes extensions to achieve this.

Here is one I use: http://hackage.haskell.org/package/interpolatedstring-perl6-0.9.0/docs/Text-InterpolatedString-Perl6.html

Your example would look like:

file = [q|
the first line
the second line
the third line
|]
share|improve this answer

Some time ago I released a library named "neat-interpolation" to solve the problem of multiline strings and interpolation using the QuasiQoutes extension. Its primary advantage over competitors is a smart management of whitespace, which takes care of interpolated multiline strings. Following is an example of how it works.

Executing the following:

{-# LANGUAGE QuasiQuotes, OverloadedStrings #-}

import NeatInterpolation

f :: String -> String -> String
f a b = 
  [string|
    function(){
      function(){
        $a
      }
      return $b
    }
  |]

main = putStrLn $ f "1" "2"

will produce this (notice the reduced indentation compared to how it was declared):

function(){
  function(){
    1
  }
  return 2
}

Now let's test it with multiline string parameters:

main = putStrLn $ f 
  "{\n  indented line\n  indented line\n}" 
  "{\n  indented line\n  indented line\n}" 

We get

function(){
  function(){
    {
      indented line
      indented line
    }
  }
  return {
    indented line
    indented line
  }
}

Notice how it neatly preserved the indentation levels of lines the variable placeholders were at. The standard interpolators would have messed all the whitespace and produced something like the following instead:

    function(){
      function(){
        {
  indented line
  indented line
}
      }
      return {
  indented line
  indented line
}
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, very interesting. –  Jonathan Fischoff Apr 7 at 22:14

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