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I've been trying to determine whether the 3GB switch is on or off on the system my program is running by calling GetSystemInfo() and checking lpMaximumApplicationAddress on the SYSTEM_INFO struct.

No luck. I think I am doing something wrong.

How do you check whether the 3GB switch is on or not on Windows in C? Code is appreciated.

thanks

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lpMaximumApplicationAddress is the right thing to check. What is returned when you try it? –  Gabe Feb 18 '10 at 22:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming your program is compiled as large address aware, you could simply call GlobalMemoryStatusEx and check the ullTotalVirtual field. If it's larger than 2GB, and you're running on a 32-bit system, then the 3GB flag must be turned on.

I actually have no idea how to 'properly' tell if Windows is natively 32 or 64 bit, but if you have a 32-bit process you could call IsWow64Process to see if you're running on a 64-bit OS.

This all seems a bit indirect, I know :)

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Is your program IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE ?

http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system/platform/server/PAE/PAEmem.mspx

Executables that can use the 3-GB address space are required to have the bit IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE set in their image header. If you are the developer of the executable, you can specify a linker flag (/LARGEADDRESSAWARE).

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I just need to know whether it's on or not. that's all –  Jessica Feb 18 '10 at 21:33
    
The program you use to test whether it's on must be built /LARGEADDRESSAWARE. is it? –  John Knoeller Feb 18 '10 at 21:42
    
thanks. I'll ask again: Is there a way to know whether the 3gb switch is ON or OFF by code? If yes, do you know how to do this? regardless of whether that flag is set. –  Jessica Feb 18 '10 at 21:43
3  
@Jessica: I think John is trying to tell you that Windows will lie to your application unless the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE bit is set in the executable. –  Michael Burr Feb 19 '10 at 0:21

FWIW, I've been able to do the detection using the following code (found here) :

if (!isWow64())
{
  BOOL b3GBSwitch = FALSE;
  SYSTEM_INFO siSysInfo;
  GetSystemInfo(&siSysInfo);
  b3GBSwitch = ((DWORD)siSysInfo.lpMaximumApplicationAddress & 0x80000000) != 0;
  printf("3GB Switch Enabled: %d\n", b3GBSwitch );
}

The code is executed in a process that is not LARGEADDRESSAWARE.

So far I've been able to test on Xp x86, Vista x86 and Seven x64.

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