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I'm working on controller rspec's and I'm starting to hate RSpec for it's inconsistency about how tests should be constructed. There should be one way to do one thing. I wish to hear from you that I'm doing something wrong so I could learn how it should be but the more I read about it the more confusions I have.

Let's forget about should and focus only on the new expect syntax and take this simple scaffold:

describe "foo" do
  before do
    @foo = create(:foo)
    # _A_
  end
  # _B_
end

I marked 2 places there as _A_ and _B_. Than lets take delete action as an example. The most common expectations for delete action for success context would be:

  1. remove something from database
  2. redirect to some page
  3. show some flash[:notice]

So test for 1st expectation can be:

_B_: it { expect{delete :destroy, id @foo}.to change(Foo, :count).by(-1)

But to test 2nd expectation would be good to move delete to the before section:

_A_: delete :destroy, id: @foo
_B_: it { expect(response).to redirect_to some_url }

delete has to be run first to use expect(response). Similar with 3rd:

_A_: delete :destroy, id: @foo
_B_: it { expect(flash[:notice]).to_not be_nil }
     it { expect(flash[:error]).to be_nil }

So how to put 1st with 2nd and 3rd into one clear looking describe block ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
describe "delete" do
  before(:each) do
    @foo = Foo.create
  end
  it "should delete from the database" do
    expect(delete :destroy, id: @foo).to change(Foo, :count).by(-1)
  end
  context do
    before(:each) do
      delete :destroy, id: @foo
    end
    it "should redirect" do
      expect(response).to redirect_to some_url
    end
    it "should set the flash" do
      expect(flash[:notice]).to_not be_nil
      expect(flash[:error]).to be_nil
    end
  end
end

Yes, the delete action appears twice. Test code is often hard to DRY up. IMHO you shouldn't sacrifice clarity to save space when writing specs.

There should be one way to do one thing.

Sure, we can have best practices, but that doesn't mean all specs need to be written the same way if there is some compelling reason to do otherwise.

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BTW: how to make a test to check if :notice is the one and only flash that is set ? –  pawel7318 Apr 8 '14 at 1:05
    
Sounds good and it convinces me pretty well. As you said I shouldn't sacrifice clarity. I wish to use context not as a workaround to put another before block but to make 2 separate blocks for success and failure. I thought to go even farther to the way that Bruce Xinda Lin proposed but.. than I fall into another trap. I can't use it_behaves_like (for flash messages which are frequently used) within it so I need to use context anyway. –  pawel7318 Apr 8 '14 at 1:10

You can put them in three different tests:

describe "foo" do
  before(:each) do
    @foo = create(:foo)
  end

  it 'removes something from database' do
    expect{delete :destroy, id @foo}.to change(Foo, :count).by(-1)
  end

  it 'redirect to some page' do
    delete :destroy, id: @foo
    expect(response).to redirect_to some_url
  end

  it 'show some flash[:notice]' do
     delete :destroy, id: @foo
     expect(flash[:notice]).to_not be_nil 
     expect(flash[:error]).to be_nil 
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Very clear looking and I thought I'll go that way even if it's not DRY at all. Finally I had to abandon that idea as I couldn't put flash to shared_examples and use it here that way (I had to use context with its own before block as zetetic proposed. –  pawel7318 Apr 8 '14 at 1:23

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