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I'm just wondering if it's fine to declare variables with JSON format?

For example, do this:

$(function(){
    var global = {
        varA : 'This is a global variable from global.varA ~!',
        varB : 'This is a global variable from global.varB ~!'
    };

    alert(global.varA);
    alert(global.varB);
});

Instead of this:

$(function(){
    var globalVarA = 'This is a global variable from globalVarA ~!',
        globalVarB = 'This is a global variable from globalVarA ~!';

    alert(globalVarA);
});
  • The reason why I want to do this is that, It would be easier to look for when I work on a really long JS file. And anything starts with global. I know it is a global variable.
  • Is it a good practice?
  • Is there anything I need to put into considerations?
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1  
It's not json, it's just a javascript object. –  zerkms Apr 8 '14 at 2:08
1  
And you are not creating global variables at all. The first is completely valid JS, so why not just do that? What it does is create a local variable global whose value is an object. edit: Oh you are asking whether it's "fine". Yes it is ;) –  Felix Kling Apr 8 '14 at 2:09

2 Answers 2

First, this is not JSON format, it's just normal javascript object literal.

Second, since it's valid syntax, you could do this, and this is normal practice to put the variables in a namespace (through there's no namespace concept in javascript).

If you want to make global be global, then you could set it to be a property of the global object window:

$(function(){
    var global = {
        varA : 'This is a global variable from global.varA ~!',
        varB : 'This is a global variable from global.varB ~!'
    };
    window['global'] = global;    
});
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Your "new variables" are actually properties of an object literal. They are not variables, nor do they have global scope. However, I don't think it's the worst way to define "references to values". You're using an object as an associative array, which is A-OK.

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