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For my application I need to store some data in an array with the properties (string main, string[] status, int curParCount, etc.).

I am currently storing it in this class:

class Repository
{
    public static Rep[] rep = new Rep[6];
    public struct Rep
    {
        public string main;
        public string clean;
        public int curParCount;
        public int totalCount;
        public int parStart;
        public int partialStart;
        public double scrollPos;
        public int selectionStart;
        public int selectionEnd;
        public string[] status;
    }    
    public static string repName()
    {
        string name;
        if (MainWindow.repnum == 0)
        { name = "Main Text"; }
        else { name = "Repository " + MainWindow.repnum; }
        return name;
    }
    public static string getStatus(int repNum, int statNum)
    {
        return rep[repNum].status[statNum];
    }                                                                  
 }

Is this the right way for me to do this? It sure doesn't feel like it is.

share|improve this question
    
Why doesn't it feel right? It looks simple and it sounds like it fits your requirements. What's the matter? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Feb 18 '10 at 22:15
    
Make it into an entity bean, make all attributes privates and create each getter/setter methods for all your attributes. Your code isn't bad at all, I'm just throwing my 2 cent worth. –  Buhake Sindi Feb 18 '10 at 22:21
1  
@Elite Gentleman: You're thinking of Java. –  SLaks Feb 18 '10 at 22:27
    
@highone: Are there other members in the Repository class? –  Steven Sudit Feb 18 '10 at 22:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The basic idea is fine. The implementation could be improved. In particular, I'm concerned that you have a mutable struct; either make it immutable or turn it into a class. I'd also recommend changing the public fields into public properties with automatic backing fields (and then upper-casing the names).

edit

Here's my version:

class Repository
{
    public class Rep
    {
        public string Main {get; set;}
        public string Clean {get; set;}
        public int CurParCount {get; set;}
        public int TotalCount {get; set;}
        public int ParStart {get; set;}
        public int PartialStart {get; set;}
        public double ScrollPos {get; set;}
        public int SelectionStart {get; set;}
        public int SelectionEnd {get; set;}
        public string[] Statuses {get; set;}
    }                                       


    public const int StatusCount = 6;
    public static List<Rep> Reps = new List<Rep>();

    public static string Name
    {
        get
        { 
            if (MainWindow.repnum == 0)
              return "Main Text";

            return "Repository " + MainWindow.repnum;
        }
    }

    public static string GetStatus(int repIndex, int statIndex)
    { return Reps[repIndex].Status[statIndex]; }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Can somebody please post a link as to WHY a mutable struct is a bad thing ESPECIALLY in a non-public struct (used internally only)? Why wrap in properties on implementation details if you're not making "Fancy" code behind the property? This quirk of C# has never made sense. Why properties exist is fine, but why you'd do a thin wrapper makes no sense in non-public interfaces. –  Kevin Anderson Feb 18 '10 at 22:21
2  
@Kevin - The main reason I would suggest class/properties here is that the OP specified WPF, and you need properties for databinding. But try this: csharpindepth.com/Articles/Chapter8/PropertiesMatter.aspx –  Stephen Wrighton Feb 18 '10 at 22:25
1  
Briefly: These are public fields, so "non-public interface" is not accurate. Properties let you change the implementation, add logic, set breakpoints. They're the right way to do this, and within an assembly they are completely free. –  Steven Sudit Feb 18 '10 at 22:27
1  
Ouch, that stings. Actually, I'm unwilling to tamper with this aspect without knowing more. There may well be omitted members of the containing class that explain its existence. Perhaps highone could clarify. –  Steven Sudit Feb 18 '10 at 22:43
1  
Based on new info from the OP, I changed the array to a list. –  Steven Sudit Feb 18 '10 at 23:12

Well, the way I would do it...

Public Class Repository: ObservableCollection<RepositoryItem>
{
}


public class RepositoryItem
    {
        public string main {get; set};
        public string clean {get; set};
        public int curParCount {get; set};
        public int totalCount {get; set};
        public int parStart {get; set};
        public int partialStart {get; set};
        public double scrollPos {get; set};
        public int selectionStart {get; set};
        public int selectionEnd {get; set};
        public string[] status {get; };
    }     

Basically, this is a class of RepositoryItem (which holds your data, and any functions that you may need to utilize to IMPACT that data) and then a class Repository, which inherits the ObservableCollection class, typing it to the RepositoryItem.

share|improve this answer
1  
The property should not be an array. –  SLaks Feb 18 '10 at 22:22
    
@SLaks: Why not? –  Bryan Feb 18 '10 at 22:28
2  
Actually, as it stands, the status property is permanently null. That's not good. (Oh, and properties are uppercase, remember?) –  Steven Sudit Feb 18 '10 at 22:29

ParStart and PartialStart sound like the same thing. You should rename one of those fields to make the name more descriptive. Also, if Par is an abbreviation, then don't abbreviate. You should generally avoid abbreviations(but acronyms are OK if they are well known). The same goes for "Rep" if that is an abbreviation.

Additionally I agree with all of Steven's notes.

share|improve this answer
    class RepositoryManager
    {
        private static List<Repository> Repo { get; set; }
        .
        .
        .
    }

    public class Repository          
    {
            public string Main { get; set; }
            public string Clean { get; set; }
            public int CurParCount { get; set; }
            .
            .
    }                                           
share|improve this answer
    
Why not use properties? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Feb 18 '10 at 22:22
    
made correction –  Asad Butt Feb 18 '10 at 22:25
1  
No, it still has fields instead of properties. –  Steven Sudit Feb 18 '10 at 22:33
    
It is bit better now, thanks again –  Asad Butt Feb 18 '10 at 22:52

There are a few things that I would change in order to follow best practices.

First, I would address what the separation of concerns issue you have. The Rep struct doesn't need to be a nested class, in my opinion, I would remove it, like so (and also call it something else):

class Repository 
{ 
    public static Rep[] rep = new Rep[6]; 
}

public struct RepositoryItem
{
    public string main; 
    public string clean; 
    public int curParCount; 
    public int totalCount; 
    public int parStart; 
    public int partialStart; 
    public double scrollPos; 
    public int selectionStart; 
    public int selectionEnd; 
    public string[] status; 
}

Now, if you look, you have a Repository class that does nothing but hold the array. Since that is the case, you can effectively eliminate that and create your array as a variable and store that anywhere you wish.

That leaves the RepositoryItem structure. I would first address the issues that violate the design guidelines for class libraries. The biggest offense here is the naming of the fields, they should be Pascal-cased:

public struct RepositoryItem
{
    public string Main; 
    public string Clean; 
    public int CurParCount; 
    public int TotalCount; 
    public int ParStart; 
    public int PartialStart; 
    public double ScrollPos; 
    public int SelectionStart; 
    public int SelectionEnd; 
    public string[] Status; 
}

You should also give your field names more meaningful names. While "Pos" might be obvious to you, it might not be obvious to others. "ScrollPosition" might be a better name than "ScrollPos".

Now, beyond that, it gets a little more subjective. The questions you have to ask are, should this be a structure (if you want copy-by-value semantics, then great, it should be) or a class? Also, should the fields be read only (if so, this should be a class and you should have a constructor which takes all the values)?

Also, consider the implications if the properties/fields are read-only. If the Status field is read only, consider exposing it as an IEnumerable instead of an array, as it will give you much more flexibility in assigning the value as opposed to forcing the contiguous memory that arrays demand (also, you will protect from setting elements in the array, since the reference to the array is read-only, not the elements in the array themselves).

share|improve this answer
8  
I would suggest not putting in a "placeholder for an answer". Either you have an answer, or you don't. –  Nick Feb 18 '10 at 22:17
2  
downvotes are not fair..... –  Eric Feb 18 '10 at 22:18
2  
Downvotes seem fair - the answer is not useful as it is. Don't post it until it's useful. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Feb 18 '10 at 22:21
2  
I might also address the magic number. Why is it exactly 6? Will it ever change? –  Instance Hunter Feb 18 '10 at 22:30
1  
It should be noted that placeholders are completely valid, as per the "Fastest Gun in the West" problem: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/9731/… - Downvotes are fair when the answer isn't correct, but if the question is answered correctly (and it was, his design was bad, it's a binary answer, yes or no), then downvoting is not a good idea. It's one thing to downvote because the answer isn't right, another because you are voting against policy (which is an improper use of the vote). –  casperOne Feb 18 '10 at 22:31

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