Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've been going crazy trying to figure out what stupid thing I'm doing wrong here.

I'm using NumPy, and I have specific row indices and specific column indices that I want to select from. Here's the gist of my problem:

import numpy as np

a = np.arange(20).reshape((5,4))
# array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3],
#        [ 4,  5,  6,  7],
#        [ 8,  9, 10, 11],
#        [12, 13, 14, 15],
#        [16, 17, 18, 19]])

# If I select certain rows, it works
print a[[0, 1, 3], :]
# array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3],
#        [ 4,  5,  6,  7],
#        [12, 13, 14, 15]])

# If I select certain rows and a single column, it works
print a[[0, 1, 3], 2]
# array([ 2,  6, 14])

# But if I select certain rows AND certain columns, it fails
print a[[0,1,3], [0,2]]
# Traceback (most recent call last):
#   File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
# ValueError: shape mismatch: objects cannot be broadcast to a single shape

Why is this happening? Surely I should be able to select the 1st, 2nd, and 4th rows, and 1st and 3rd columns? The result I'm expecting is:

a[[0,1,3], [0,2]] => [[0,  2],
                      [4,  6],
                      [12, 14]]
share|improve this question
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Fancy indexing requires you to provide all indices for each dimension. You are providing 3 indices for the first one, and only 2 for the second one, hence the error. You want to do something like this:

>>> a[[[0, 0], [1, 1], [3, 3]], [[0,2], [0,2], [0, 2]]]
array([[ 0,  2],
       [ 4,  6],
       [12, 14]])

That is of course a pain to write, so you can let broadcasting help you:

>>> a[[[0], [1], [3]], [0, 2]]
array([[ 0,  2],
       [ 4,  6],
       [12, 14]])

This is much simpler to do if you index with arrays, not lists:

>>> row_idx = np.array([0, 1, 3])
>>> col_idx = np.array([0, 2])
>>> a[row_idx[:, None], col_idx]
array([[ 0,  2],
       [ 4,  6],
       [12, 14]])
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, I did not know you could do this! Broadcasting is weird and wonderful... After two years of numpy, I'm still getting used to it. – Praveen Apr 8 '14 at 8:15
    
Thanks! While the other answers did answer my question correctly in terms of returning the selected matrix, this answer addressed that while also addressing the issue of assignment (how to set a[[0,1,3], [0,2]] = 0, for example). – Mike C Apr 8 '14 at 16:34
    
@Jaime - Just yesterday I discovered a one-liner built-in to do exactly the broadcasting trick you suggest: np.ix_ – Praveen Jan 9 at 10:29

As Toan suggests, a simple hack would be to just select the rows first, and then select the columns over that.

>>> a[[0,1,3], :]            # Returns the rows you want
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3],
       [ 4,  5,  6,  7],
       [12, 13, 14, 15]])
>>> a[[0,1,3], :][:, [0,2]]  # Selects the columns you want as well
array([[ 0,  2],
       [ 4,  6],
       [12, 14]])

[Edit] The built-in method: np.ix_

I recently discovered that numpy gives you an in-built one-liner to doing exactly what @Jaime suggested, but without having to use broadcasting syntax (which suffers from lack of readability). From the docs:

Using ix_ one can quickly construct index arrays that will index the cross product. a[np.ix_([1,3],[2,5])] returns the array [[a[1,2] a[1,5]], [a[3,2] a[3,5]]].

So you use it like this:

>>> a = np.arange(20).reshape((5,4))
>>> a[np.ix_([0,1,3], [0,2])]
array([[ 0,  2],
       [ 4,  6],
       [12, 14]])

And the way it works is that it takes care of aligning arrays the way Jaime suggested, so that broadcasting happens properly:

>>> np.ix_([0,1,3], [0,2])
(array([[0],
        [1],
        [3]]), array([[0, 2]]))
share|improve this answer

USE:

 >>> a[[0,1,3]][:,[0,2]]
array([[ 0,  2],
   [ 4,  6],
   [12, 14]])

OR:

>>> a[[0,1,3],::2]
array([[ 0,  2],
   [ 4,  6],
   [12, 14]])
share|improve this answer
2  
While this is correct, you should consider posting a bit of further information explaining why it is correct. – ebarr Apr 8 '14 at 7:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.