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In the land of Puzzlevania, Aaron, Bob, and Charlie had an argument over which one of them was the greatest puzzler of all time. To end the argument once and for all, they agreed on a duel to the death.

Aaron was a poor shooter and only hit his target with a probability of 1>3.

Bob was a bit better and hit his target with a probability of 1>2.

Charlie was an expert marksman and never missed. A hit means a kill and the person hit drops out of the duel.

To compensate for the inequities in their marksmanship skills, the three decided that they would fire in turns, starting with Aaron, followed by Bob, and then by Charlie. The cycle would repeat until there was one man standing, and that man would be the Greatest Puzzler of All Time.

An obvious and reasonable strategy is for each man to shoot at the most accurate shooter still alive, on the grounds that this shooter is the deadliest and has the best chance of hitting back.Write a program to simulate the duel using this strategy.

Your program should use random numbers and the probabilities given in the problem to determine whether a shooter hits the target.

Create a class named Duelist that contains the dueler’s name and shooting accuracy, a Boolean indicating whether the dueler is still alive, and a method ShootAtTarget ( Duelist target ) that sets the target to dead if the dueler hits his target (using a random number and the shooting accuracy) and does nothing otherwise.

Once you can simulate a single duel, add a loop to your program that simulates 10,000 duels. Count the number of times that each contestant wins and print the probability of winning for each contestant (e.g., for Aaron your program might output “Aaron won 3,595>10,000 duels or 35.95%”).

An alternate strategy is for Aaron to intentionally miss on his first shot. Modify the program to accommodate this new strategy and output the probability of winning for each contestant.

Which strategy is better for Aaron: to intentionally miss on the first shot or to try and hit the best shooter? Who has the best chance of winning, the best shooter or the worst shooter?

Ok so that the problem. Here is my code so far:

public class Duelist {

private String name;
private double probabilityOfHitting;
private boolean alive = true;


//Only declared instance variables. Must created setters and getters
public void setName(String newName){
    name = newName;
}
//name setter created

public void setProbabilityOfHitting( double newProbabilityOfHitting){
    probabilityOfHitting = newProbabilityOfHitting;
}
//probability of hitting setter created
public void setAlive(boolean newAlive){
    alive = newAlive;
}
//name setter created
//now must create getters
public String getName(){
    return name;
}
//created the name getter
public double getProbabilityOfHitting(){
    return probabilityOfHitting;
}
//created the probability of hitting getter
public boolean getAlive(){

return alive;
}
//created the alive getter
//no constructors created before
public Duelist(String tempName, double tempProbability){
    name = tempName;
    probabilityOfHitting = tempProbability;
}
//constructor is now created
//need to create a method for the duelists to shoot at each other
public void shootAtTarget(Duelist target){
    double randomNum = Math.random();
    if (this.probabilityOfHitting ==1){
        target.setAlive(false);
        target.getAlive();
    }

        else if (randomNum <= this.probabilityOfHitting){
        target.setAlive(false);
        target.getAlive();
        }
        else {
            target.getAlive();
        }
    }           
}


public class Tester {
public static void main(String[] args) {

    int winsA = 0;
    int winsB = 0;
    int winsC = 0;

Duelist aaron = new Duelist("Aaron",(1/3));
Duelist bob = new Duelist("Bob", (1/2));
Duelist charlie = new Duelist("Charlie", 1);

if(aaron.getAlive() == true){

    if(charlie.getAlive()== true){
        aaron.shootAtTarget(charlie);
        }
        else if(bob.getAlive() == true){
            aaron.shootAtTarget(bob);
        }
        else{
            winsA++;
        }

}
    else if(bob.getAlive() == true){
        if(charlie.getAlive() == true){
            bob.shootAtTarget(charlie);
        }
            else if(aaron.getAlive() == true){
                bob.shootAtTarget(aaron);
            }
            else{
                winsB++;
            }
    }
    else{
        if (bob.getAlive() == true){
            charlie.shootAtTarget(bob);
        }
            else if(aaron.getAlive() == true){
                charlie.shootAtTarget(aaron);
            }
            else{
                winsC++;
            }
    }
    System.out.println(winsA);
    System.out.println(winsB);
    System.out.println(winsC);


 }

}

I know I haven't gotten close to finishing the problem yet. What I did in my tester class was to try and simulate one duel and once when I simulated one duel, I would be able to loop it so I can simulate more. The problem I'm having is that the when I run the code, the wins for Aaron, Bob, and Charlie all come up to 0 and I don't know why.

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2  
You might also want to use a debugger. – devnull Apr 8 '14 at 5:57
    
Slightly OT: Shouldn't the class be named ´Trielist´ instead of ´Duelist´ if there are three people involved? – Drunix Apr 8 '14 at 9:16

As the last parameter in the constructor calls, you wrote

Duelist aaron = new Duelist("Aaron",(1/3));

There you are dividing an int by another int, and the result will be 0 in this case. This has to be changed to

Duelist aaron = new Duelist("Aaron",(1.0/3.0));

so that double values are used (and the result will be 0.3333, as desired).

Most of your Duelist class does not seem to be "wrong", but the shootAtTarget method could be improved.

A general hint: I'd recommend you to never use Math.random(). This will deliver unpredictable results. Instead, you should use an instance of java.util.Random. This can be initialized with a certain random seed, so that it always provides the same sequence of random numbers. This makes debugging much easier.

Additonally, some tests have been redundant. When the probabilityOfHitting is 1.0, then there is no special test required: The random number will always be less-than-or-equal to 1.0. You are also occasionally calling target.getAlive() for no apparent reason.

So in the end, the method could look like this:

private static Random random = new Random(0);

//need to create a method for the duelists to shoot at each other
public void shootAtTarget(Duelist target)
{
    double randomNum = random.nextDouble();
    if (randomNum <= this.probabilityOfHitting)
    {
        target.setAlive(false);
    }
}           

However, the main problem was in your Test class. I'm not sure about general recommendations here. One could go very far in terms of abstraction. (A Java Enterprise Architect would probably end up with writing a AbstractDuelistStrategyFactory somewhere...). But to put it simply: At the moment, you are doing at most one shot. After one shot, nobody can have won. And you don't know how many shots have to be taken before there is only one duelist remaining.

Much of this could be made more elegant and flexible if you placed the Duelists into a List<Duelist>. But without that, an approach that is "structurally close to what you started" could look like this:

    int alive = 3;
    while (alive > 1)
    {
        System.out.println("Status: A:"+aaron.getAlive()+" B:"+bob.getAlive()+" C:"+charlie.getAlive());
        if (aaron.getAlive())
        {
            if(charlie.getAlive())
            {
                System.out.println("A shoots at C");
                aaron.shootAtTarget(charlie);
                if (!charlie.getAlive())
                {
                    System.out.println("A killed C");
                    alive--;
                }
            }
            else if(bob.getAlive())
            {
                System.out.println("A shoots at B");
                aaron.shootAtTarget(bob);
                if (!bob.getAlive())
                {
                    System.out.println("A killed B");
                    alive--;
                }
            }
        }
        // Other cases ...
    }

    if (aaron.getAlive())
    {
        winsA++;
    }
    if (bob.getAlive())
    {
        winsB++;
    }
    if (charlie.getAlive())
    {
        winsC++;
    }

(Note that there are still cases missing!)

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