Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm in the rather poor situation of not being able to use the CUDA debugger. I'm getting some strange results from usage of __syncthreads in an application with a single shared array (deltas). The following piece of code is performed in a loop:

__syncthreads(); //if I comment this out, things get funny
deltas[lex_index_block] = intensity - mean;
__syncthreads(); //this line doesnt seem to matter regardless if the first sync is commented out or not
//after sync: do something with the values of delta written in this threads and other threads of this block

Basically, I have code with overlapping blocks (required due to the nature of the algorithm). The program does compile and run but somehow I get systematically wrong values in the areas of vertical overlap. This is very confusing to me as I thought that the correct way to sync is to sync after the threads have performed my write to the shared memory.

This is the whole function:

//XC without repetitions
template <int blocksize, int order>
__global__ void __xc(unsigned short* raw_input_data, int num_frames, int width, int height,
                 float * raw_sofi_data, int block_size, int order_deprecated){

//we make a distinction between real pixels and virtual pixels
//real pixels are pixels that exist in the original data

//overlap correction: every new block has a margin of 3 threads doing less work (only computing deltas)
int x_corrected = global_x() - blockIdx.x * 3;
int y_corrected = global_y() - blockIdx.y * 3;

//if the thread is responsible for any real pixel
if (x_corrected < width && y_corrected < height){

    //        __shared__ float deltas[blocksize];
    __shared__ float deltas[blocksize];

    //the outer pixels of a block do not update SOFI values as they do not have sufficient information available
    //they are used only to compute mean and delta
    //also, pixels at the global edge have to be thrown away (as there is not sufficient data to interpolate)
    bool within_inner_block =
            threadIdx.x > 0
            && threadIdx.y > 0
            && threadIdx.x < blockDim.x - 2
            && threadIdx.y < blockDim.y - 2
            //global edge
            && x_corrected > 0
            && y_corrected > 0
            && x_corrected < width - 1
            && y_corrected < height - 1
            ;


    //init virtual pixels
    float virtual_pixels[order * order];
    if (within_inner_block){
        for (int i = 0; i < order * order; ++i) {
            virtual_pixels[i] = 0;
        }
    }


    float mean = 0;
    float intensity;
    int lex_index_block = threadIdx.x + threadIdx.y * blockDim.x;



    //main loop
    for (int frame_idx = 0; frame_idx < num_frames; ++frame_idx) {

        //shared memory read and computation of mean/delta
        intensity = raw_input_data[lex_index_3D(x_corrected,y_corrected, frame_idx, width, height)];

        __syncthreads(); //if I comment this out, things break
        deltas[lex_index_block] = intensity - mean;
        __syncthreads(); //this doesnt seem to matter

        mean = deltas[lex_index_block]/(float)(frame_idx+1);

        //if the thread is responsible for correlated pixels, i.e. not at the border of the original frame
        if (within_inner_block){
            //WORKING WITH DELTA STARTS HERE
            virtual_pixels[0] += deltas[lex_index_2D(
                        threadIdx.x,
                        threadIdx.y + 1,
                        blockDim.x)]
                    *
                    deltas[lex_index_2D(
                        threadIdx.x,
                        threadIdx.y - 1,
                        blockDim.x)];

            virtual_pixels[1] += deltas[lex_index_2D(
                        threadIdx.x,
                        threadIdx.y,
                        blockDim.x)]
                    *
                    deltas[lex_index_2D(
                        threadIdx.x + 1,
                        threadIdx.y,
                        blockDim.x)];

            virtual_pixels[2] += deltas[lex_index_2D(
                        threadIdx.x,
                        threadIdx.y,
                        blockDim.x)]
                    *
                    deltas[lex_index_2D(
                        threadIdx.x,
                        threadIdx.y + 1,
                        blockDim.x)];

            virtual_pixels[3] += deltas[lex_index_2D(
                        threadIdx.x,
                        threadIdx.y,
                        blockDim.x)]
                    *
                    deltas[lex_index_2D(
                        threadIdx.x+1,
                        threadIdx.y+1,
                        blockDim.x)];
            //                xc_update<order>(virtual_pixels, delta2, mean);
        }
    }

    if (within_inner_block){
        for (int virtual_idx = 0; virtual_idx < order*order; ++virtual_idx) {
            raw_sofi_data[lex_index_2D(x_corrected*order + virtual_idx % order,
                                       y_corrected*order + (int)floorf(virtual_idx / order),
                                       width*order)]=virtual_pixels[virtual_idx];
        }
    }
}
}
share|improve this question
1  
You declare deltas as an array of blocksize elements. But how much is blocksize? Remember that lex_index_block is the absolute index within a block. Also, remember that synchronization is only within a block, not across blocks, see cuda block synchronization. –  JackOLantern Apr 8 '14 at 9:48
1  
It certainly seems like you could have a race condition between the computation of intensity and the line of code between the __syncthreads() that uses that value. There are many elements that you haven't shown the definition of. If your question is "why does my code work with this __syncthreads() but not without it", I'm not sure anyone can answer that. What your code is or does can't be deduced from what you've shown, since many things are not defined. What CUDA version are you using? You might try running your code with cuda-memcheck using the --racecheck option. –  Robert Crovella Apr 8 '14 at 18:44
1  
It's not clear what your question is, or what your problem is. Furthermore, I don't think the problem can be diagnosed from the incomplete sample shown here. Voting to close. –  Robert Crovella Apr 8 '14 at 21:14
1  
Which CUDA debugger? cuda-gdb or Nsight VSE? –  Greg Smith Apr 8 '14 at 22:24
2  
Can you also include the full code (host + device) to make this example compilable ? From what I can see, there could be a hazard in your application between loop iterations. The write to delta[lex_index_block] for loop iteration frame_idx+1 could be mapped to the same location as the read of deltas[lex_index_2D(threadIdx.x, threadIdx.y -1, blockDim.x)] in a different thread at iteration frame_idx. The two accesses are unordered and the result is nondeterministic. That said, cuda-memcheck --tool racecheck should have caught this. Could you post the output of racecheck ? –  Vyas Apr 9 '14 at 16:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From what I can see, there could be a hazard in your application between loop iterations. The write to deltas[lex_index_block] for loop iteration frame_idx+1 could be mapped to the same location as the read of deltas[lex_index_2D(threadIdx.x, threadIdx.y -1, blockDim.x)] in a different thread at iteration frame_idx. The two accesses are unordered and the result is nondeterministic. Try running the app with cuda-memcheck --tool racecheck.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.