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I have objects, they get locks. I want to test if they are locked without acquiring a lock. The idea is if I TryEnter() they i have to Exit() if true to only check the lock correctly.

Seems like a really basic question, how is it done?

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4 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

What possible information can you get from knowing the lock was unlocked back when you looked at it? By the time you make a decision based on that information, the lock may be already taken.

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3  
+1, exactly. Answering this question about the past state of the lock can only lead you to making incorrect decisions. –  JaredPar Feb 18 '10 at 23:19
3  
When you examine IsBeingUsed, the thread may already have stopped useful work but a context switch may have happened before IsBeingUsed was updated. –  Eric J. Feb 18 '10 at 23:25
1  
@Eric: or worse: IsBeingUsed is 0 and you go ahead and do changes, oblivious to the fact that in the meantime someone did change it to 1. –  Remus Rusanu Feb 18 '10 at 23:27
1  
I can see a use for this kind of behaviour. Imagine a situation wherein a lock is acquired for a long period of time, and two threads need to do different things to the same set of objects. If the two collection operations are not order-dependent, then it could be useful to peek at an object first, and skip it to be processed in a later pass if it is in use. –  Tullo Feb 18 '10 at 23:36
4  
@Tullo: But that can be solved better with an zero wait acquire like Monitor.TryEnter. Zero wait aquire means you are willing to grab the lock if is free, but not willing to wait. The OP asked for different semantics, ie. peek without acquire. I really can't see any real use for such semantics. –  Remus Rusanu Feb 18 '10 at 23:40
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Because the lock statement is equivalent to:

System.Threading.Monitor.Enter(x);
try {
   ...
}
finally {
   System.Threading.Monitor.Exit(x);
}

Can you just do this?

bool ObjectWasUnlocked(object x)
{
   if(System.Threading.Monitor.TryEnter(x))
   {
       System.Threading.Monitor.Exit(x);
       return true;
   }
   else
   {
       return false;
   }
}

Note that I'm naming this function "ObjectWasUnlocked" as opposed to "ObjectIsUnlocked". There is no guarantee that it will still be unlocked when the function has returned.

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In this solution though you acquire the lock which is something the OP did not want to do. –  JaredPar Feb 18 '10 at 23:51
    
@JaredPar: Yep, good point. –  Andrew Shepherd Feb 19 '10 at 0:41
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I was wondering the same thing while trying to audit my code for correct locking. I came up with a method using a second thread. If the lock is available to the calling thread, but unavailable to a second thread, it must be held by the first.

    /// <summary>
/// Utiltity for checking if a lock has already been acquired.
/// WARNING: This test isn't actually thread-safe, 
/// it's only really useful for unit tests
/// </summary>
private static bool ObjectIsAlreadyLockedByThisThread(object lockObject)
{
    if (!Monitor.TryEnter(lockObject))
    {
        // another thread has the lock
        return false;
    }

    Monitor.Exit(lockObject);

    bool? LockAvailable = null;

    var T = new Thread(() =>
    {
        if (Monitor.TryEnter(lockObject))
        {
            LockAvailable = true;
            Monitor.Exit(lockObject);
        }
        else
        {
            LockAvailable = false;
        }
    });

    T.Start();

    T.Join();

    return !LockAvailable.Value;
}

// Tests:
public static void TestLockedByThisThread()
{
    object MyLock = new object();
    lock (MyLock)
    {
        bool WasLocked = ObjectIsAlreadyLockedByThisThread(MyLock);

        Debug.WriteLine(WasLocked); // prints "True"
    }
}

public static void TestLockedByOtherThread()
{
    object MyLock = new object();

    var T = new Thread(() =>
    {
        lock (MyLock)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2));
        }
    });

    T.Start();
    Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));

    bool WasLocked = ObjectIsAlreadyLockedByThisThread(MyLock);

    T.Join();

    Debug.WriteLine(WasLocked); // prints "False"
}

public static void TestNotLocked()
{
    object MyLock = new object();

    bool WasLocked = ObjectIsAlreadyLockedByThisThread(MyLock);

    Debug.WriteLine(WasLocked); // prints "False"
}

I wouldn't use this in production code - there's a race condition that could blow up. However, my unit tests are mostly single threaded, so this was useful.

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This code is broken. The first Monitor.Exit(lockObject) (in the finally block) is called even if the lock couldn't be acquired. –  Sebastian Krysmanski Mar 13 '13 at 12:23
    
@Sebastian Krysmanski: good point, no need for the finally. fixed and clean up –  GranBurguesa Mar 20 '13 at 18:58
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Here is a related question

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/496388/checking-whether-the-current-thread-owns-a-lock

The conclusion there was 'you can't'

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