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I'm building a set of functions in an included file, and i would like to be able to run my test main() to call the function name passed on the command line. Something like this:

void rotate (int degrees) {
    /*...*/
}

void translate (int pixels) {
    /*...*/
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[] ) {
    const int degs = 100;
    const int pix = 250;

    string func = argv[1];
    //call func(degs) or func(pix) based on the command line argument passed
}

I'd like to be able to run this like % a.out translatefrom the command line. What is the syntax to make this work. Thanks in advance I looked for a while on this one and couldn't find anything.

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Am I permitted to ask why you do not use Boost unit testing framework instead? You are obviously using c++ anyways :) –  Theolodis Apr 8 '14 at 6:48
1  
You'll need to compare the input string with the function name and call if they match. There's no way to call the function via the string directly. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 8 '14 at 6:49
    
This ^. A function menu is your best chance if you want to do this. Just so you know this is called "Reflection" and it's mostly available on scripting languages. –  Veritas Apr 8 '14 at 6:51
    
@πάντα ῥεῖ I've tried if string(argv[1])=="rotate") { ... I can make this work. I was wondering if there is a more direct way. –  user3176017 Apr 8 '14 at 6:53
    
You could always use a map with function pointers like Mats proposed in his answer. –  Veritas Apr 8 '14 at 6:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is not possible to do this in C or C++, because the name of the function "disappears" when you compile the code.

The common way to solve this is to use either a std::map<std::string, FunctionPtr> or some other form of table that contains a translation between string and function pointer.

Of course a very crude version is to simply do:

if (argv[1] == std::string("translate"))
{
    int x = atoi(argv[2]);
    translate(x);
}

(You need the cast to std::string or you need to use strcmp, since using == between a char * and a string literal will just compare the address of the string, and argv isn't going to contain addresses of string literals under any reasonable circumstances)

Function pointers in std::map could be something like this

typedef void (*FuncType)(int v);

std::map<std::string, FuncType> m;

m["translate"] = translate;
m["rotate"]    = rotate;

// Convert argv[2] to integer:
int x = argv[2];
// Call function indicated by argv[1]:
m[argv[1]](x);
share|improve this answer
    
Mats, thank you for posting. I've got this sort of if statement working now. Can you give an example of how to use the map to function pointers? –  user3176017 Apr 8 '14 at 6:58
    
Edited my answer to cover that part. –  Mats Petersson Apr 8 '14 at 7:08
    
You beat me to it. –  Veritas Apr 8 '14 at 7:29
    
@MatsPetersson thanks for coming back and adding to this answer. I get it now. –  user3176017 Apr 8 '14 at 15:50

As requested...

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>

typedef void FUNC(int); 

FUNC rotate, translate;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::map<std::string, FUNC *> m;
    m["rotate"] = rotate;
    m["translate"] = translate;   

    if ( argc > 1 )
    {
        FUNC *ptr = m[argv[1]];
        if ( ptr )
            ptr(100);
    }
}

In C++11 you can use brace-enclosed initializers for m.

If the duplication bothers you, you could even go:

#define M_ROW(funcname) m[#funcname] = funcname
share|improve this answer
    
Should argv really be an array of char** ? –  Veritas Apr 8 '14 at 7:45
1  
fixed, thanks . Kinda weird that I didn't get a compilation error for that –  Matt McNabb Apr 8 '14 at 7:46
    
@MattMcNabb appreciate the macro hint to reduce the duplication –  user3176017 Apr 8 '14 at 15:50

As you requested, here is an example on how you could use std::map to achieve what you want. I am using void functions with void parameters for the sake of simplicity. In your case, you will have to use void (*)(int) for the map in order to use your functions since they take ints as parameters. You will also have to find how to pass the ints themselves. You can probably do this by taking the argv arguments by pairs.

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>

void func1() {
    std::cout << "func1" << std::endl;
}

void func2() {
    std::cout << "func2" << std::endl;
}

void func3() {
    std::cout << "func3" << std::endl;
}

std::map<std::string,void (*)(void)> tmap = {
    {"func1",&func1},
    {"func2",&func2},
    {"func3",&func3}                        
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    if (argc > 1) {
        for (int i =1; i != argc; ++i) {
            if (tmap.find(argv[i]) != tmap.end()) {
                tmap[argv[i]]();
            }
            else {
                std::cout << "There is no " << argv[i] << " function available." << std::endl;
             }
         }
    }
    else {
        std::cout << "No functions were choosen." << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
thank you. I appreciate the detail. –  user3176017 Apr 8 '14 at 15:49
    
Well, I'm glad I could help. –  Veritas Apr 8 '14 at 15:57

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