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I am currently working on an Email form and have little experience with javascript but am close to accomplishing what I need but struggling at one point, spent hours trying everything I can find searching and figured someone on here would probably have my answer instantly.

I currently have 3 functions checking a box is filled, email is correct format and passwords match. If I set each function to run on its own upon clicking submit they work perfectly for their own intended purpose, however I am having trouble working out how to make it so that all 3 functions are run upon hitting submit. My final attempt which seems closest is adding the validateForm function at the bottom of my scripts to run all scripts but this did not seem to work. Hopefully something small I am overlooking, appreciate any help.

HTML:

<form name="registerkeys" form action="form.php" method="post" onsubmit="return validateForm();">
First Name:  <input type="text" name="first_name"><br>
Last Name:  <input type="text" name="last_name"><br>
Email:  <input type="text" name="email"><br>
Phone Number:  <input type="text" name="phonenumber"><br>
Information on Key:  <input type="text" name="keyinfo"><br>
Password:  <input type="password" name="password" id="password"></label><br>
Verify Password:  <input type="password" name="passwordverify" id="passwordverify"><br>
Password Hint:  <input type="text" name="passwordhint"><br>
<textarea rows="5" name="message" cols="30" placeholder="Comments:"></textarea><br>
<input type="submit" name="submit" value="Submit">
</form>

Javascript:

function validateFill(){
    var x=document.forms["registerkeys"]["first_name"].value;
    if (x==null || x=="") {
        alert("First name must be filled out");
        return false;
  }

    var x=document.forms["registerkeys"]["last_name"].value;
    if (x==null || x=="") {
        alert("Last name must be filled out");
        return false;
  }

    var x=document.forms["registerkeys"]["phonenumber"].value;
    if (x==null || x=="") {
        alert("Phone number must be filled out");
        return false;
  }

    var x=document.forms["registerkeys"]["keyinfo"].value;
    if (x==null || x=="") {
        alert("Key info must be filled out");
        return false;
  }

    var x=document.forms["registerkeys"]["pass1"].value;
    if (x==null || x=="") {
        alert("Password must be filled out");
        return false;
  }

    var x=document.forms["registerkeys"]["passwordhint"].value;
    if (x==null || x=="") {
        alert("Password hint must be filled out");
        return false;
  }

} 


function validateEmail()
{
var x=document.forms["registerkeys"]["email"].value;
var atpos=x.indexOf("@");
var dotpos=x.lastIndexOf(".");
if (atpos<1 || dotpos<atpos+2 || dotpos+2>=x.length)
  {
  alert("Not a valid e-mail address");
  return false;
  }
}


function validatePassword(){
    var password = document.getElementById("password").value;
    var passwordverify = document.getElementById("passwordverify").value;
    var ok = true;
    if (password != passwordverify) {
        alert("Passwords Do not match");
        document.getElementById("password").style.borderColor = "#E34234";
        document.getElementById("passwordverify").style.borderColor = "#E34234";
        ok = false;
    }
    else {
        alert("Passwords Match!!!");
    }
    return ok;
}


function validateForm(){
    var a = validateFill();
    var b = validateEmail();
    var c = validatePassword();
    return a && b && c;
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your validateFill() and validateEmail() function should return true at the end.

validateFill() only returns false if validation has not passed, but never true. You should add return true at the end of the function, outside of conditions.

validateEmail() returns false if email is invalid but you are missing the return true if email is valid.

Also, to prevent duplicate popups I suggest that you change your validateForm() to something like this:

function validateForm() {
 var a = validateFill();

 if (a) var b = validateEmail();
 else var b = false;

 if (a&&b) var c = validatePassword();
 else var c = false;

 return a && b && c;
}

So it only checks one function until it passes, and then checks the next.

share|improve this answer
    
:) The same answers –  Alexander Apr 8 '14 at 8:01
    
Thanks, I have added return true; to the end of each function just before the curly bracket and this has not resolved the issue. Have I added this incorrectly. Apologies in advance I lack knowledge of javascript and what you see here are snippets collected from the web. Here is where im uploading for test purposes and as you can see none of the function are working. cjeffryes.comoj.com –  Cjeffryes13 Apr 8 '14 at 8:09
    
And what exactly is not working? It seems to be working for me, altough with multiple messages, but it seems to work? –  DKasipovic Apr 8 '14 at 8:12
    
Oh I see, it does work to some degree, but im finding if I fill everybox with one letter, and add passwords that dont match the form still submits. But if i leave a field empty I get errors including passwords dont match. Guessing my functions themselves need a bit of attention as they are all being run. –  Cjeffryes13 Apr 8 '14 at 8:17
    
Yes, see my edit about those duplicate warnings. –  DKasipovic Apr 8 '14 at 8:20

validateFill() and validateEmail() should return true at the end (right now they return nothing if validation passed.

validatePassword() should return true instead of ok.

share|improve this answer
1  
ok is a variable that is set either to true or false. Read the example. –  DKasipovic Apr 8 '14 at 7:57
    
He use two different approaches: flag in validatePassword() and return on error in other functions. One approach thought all code will be safer and i think in JS second is more standart –  Alexander Apr 8 '14 at 8:01
1  
Personally I think that directly returning false is better because it stops function execution on the first error occured. However, it can have consequences since function never gets to the end, and that can play games with your logic. –  DKasipovic Apr 8 '14 at 8:03
    
Yep, totaly agree with you. Edited comment to be clear –  Alexander Apr 8 '14 at 8:04

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