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I'm making a basic cipher for an assignment, and trying to ensure that the cipher only applies to alpha text. It was recommended I use "isalpha()" for this, so I attempted this in the following code:

if( isalpha(cipherInput))
{  
   for (int i = 0, n = strlen(cipherInput); i < n; i ++)
   {
        printf("%c", (cipherInput[i] + k % 26));               
   }
}
else
{
    printf("%s\n", cipherInput);
}

This returned "Segmentation fault (core dumped)" when I tried inputting anything, so I did some googling and found out how to debug, which returned

Core was generated by `./caesar 3'.
Program terminated with signal 11, Segmentation fault.
#0  0x0804879e in main (argc=2, argv=0xbfd14604) at caesar.c:21
21     if( isalpha(cipherInput))
(gdb) ^CQuit

Which apparently means I'm messing around with memory stacks in weird ways. Why would this happen from a simple if statement? All the examples I found online dealt with pointers.

Here's the full code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <cs50.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main (int argc, string argv[])
{
    int k = atoi(argv[1]);

    if( k <= 0 )
    {
        printf("You must input a non-negative integer.\n");
        return 1;    
    }


    printf("What do you want to cipher?\n");
    string cipherInput = GetString();

   if( isalpha(cipherInput))
   {  
    for (int i = 0, n = strlen(cipherInput); i < n; i ++)
    {

             printf("%c", (cipherInput[i] + k % 26));               
    }
    }
    else
    {
        printf("%s\n", cipherInput);
    }

    printf("\n");

}

Note: cs50.h can be found at http://dkui3cmikz357.cloudfront.net/library50/c/cs50-library-c-3.0/cs50.h

share|improve this question
1  
int isalpha(int c); – devnull Apr 8 '14 at 9:36
    
What is the definitions of string and GetString()? – Lee Duhem Apr 8 '14 at 9:36
    
This is actually C, not C++, which makes string very confusing given that this is not C++ std::string. – Matthieu M. Apr 8 '14 at 9:58
    
-1 for not knowing what language you are compiling – David Heffernan Apr 8 '14 at 10:34

The function isalpha expects an int and you are passing a string, which is a char * according to cs50.h

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response. Why would isalpha expect an int? According to cs50.harvard.edu/resources/cppreference.com/stdstring/… it's used to check if something is alpha, right? How could an int be an alpha (char?) - oh, I do see though that the "string" thing made by cs50.h is really a char with a pointer thing going on, so that would be why it caused s egmentation fault. So I need to convert each part of the "string" into separate chars, then check each with isalpha, right? – komali_2 Apr 8 '14 at 9:39
    
@komali_2 isalpha is specified as taking an int by the standard. The last sentence of your comment sounds right :) – cnicutar Apr 9 '14 at 17:34

The isalpha() function tests a single character for being alphabetical or not. It does not test an entire string. There are many such character-classification functions in the standard library; they all work on a single character at a time.

You're passing a C++ object, which is then treated as a (probably very large) character value, seemingly causing an out-of-bounds access inside isalpha().

You need to enable all compiler warnings, and make sure you #include <ctype.h>, you should have gotten warnings for this.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. That I can't pass a whole string through a char tester seems like a real "duh" thing, dunno why I didn't realize it. – komali_2 Apr 8 '14 at 9:54
1  
Wait a minute: how could a C++ object be treated as a very large character value in the first place ? – Matthieu M. Apr 8 '14 at 9:56
    
@MatthieuM. I have no idea. :( – unwind Apr 8 '14 at 10:37

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