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When attaching a continuation to boost::future, the continuation is executed in a new thread:

std::cout << "main: " << boost::this_thread::get_id() << std::endl;

boost::promise<void> p;
boost::future<void> f = p.get_future();
p.set_value();

boost::future<void> f2 = f.then([] (boost::future<void>) {
    std::cout << "future: " << boost::this_thread::get_id() << std::endl;        
});

This snippet outputs:

main: 0x7fff7a8d7310
future: 0x101781000

Why is .then() allowed to do that, and, more importantly, is there a way to customise this behaviour? Do futures returned from promise/packaged_task/async behave differently?

share|improve this question
    
.then() is like async() in that respect, I suppose. And yes there are subtle differences between futures returned from async vs. the ones directly gotten from a promise (or packaged_task). I think it was Scott Meyer who described this in most detail (and actually considers it a bad property of the current standard). There should also be boost::launch::deferred/async parameters there, like with async –  sehe Apr 8 at 10:59

1 Answer 1

It is reasonable to spawn a new thread.. Look at this code:

std::cout << "main: " << boost::this_thread::get_id() << std::endl;

boost::promise<void> p;
boost::future<void> f = p.get_future();
p.set_value();

boost::future<void> f2 = f.then([] (boost::future<void>) {
    SomeVeryVeryVeryLongLongLongLongTask();

    std::cout << "future: " << boost::this_thread::get_id() << std::endl;        
});

Without spawning a new thread, we have to wait for SomeVeryVeryVeryLongLongLongLongTask() at f.then(....


If you want to see certain evidence? In reference,

  • If the parent was created with promise<< or with a packaged_task<> (has no associated launch policy), the continuation behaves the same as the third overload with a policy argument of launch::async | launch::deferred and the same argument for func.

As you know, if we use launch::async | launch::deferred, we don't know whether a new thread is spawned or just it's deferred. But mostly a new thread is spawned, right?

PS. Um? reference say "...promise<<...". Maybe it's a mistype of promise<> >o<

PS2. see @sehe's replies. Strictly speaking, he's right.

share|improve this answer
2  
That's just defining it so. The continuation could be made to execute on the same thread as the preceding task. Spawning a thread is less expected and has downsides. In general I think the question comes down to: does boost async/then allow control over thread scheduling? (Your answer doesn't address that) –  sehe Apr 8 at 11:19
2  
Aw. That edit is very useful. But that last bit "But mostly a new thread is spawned, right?" unnecessarily kills the objectivity value. But yeah, this spells: you can't control thread scheduling here. –  sehe Apr 8 at 11:25
    
@sehe Strictly speaking, you're right. But I want to go easily... Regardless of whether a new thread is spawned or just task is run on another thread, it has a similar effect.. –  ikh Apr 8 at 11:26
1  
except if you can control the number of threads/scheduling. Imagine a boost::async::set_thread_pool_size(1) –  sehe Apr 8 at 11:27
1  
I don't think the OP is after statistics or probabilities. –  sehe Apr 8 at 11:30

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