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I use the thread local storage with boost. I have a global variable :

boost::thread_specific_ptr<MyDataClass> p_timeline_ctx;

and I have the following class, which encapsulates a boost::thread object and contains an additionnal data object :

class MyThread {
   private :
      boost::thread t;
      MyDataClass d;

   public :
      MyThread():c() {}

      void start(void) {
         ptr.reset(this->d);
         this->t = boost::thread(&MyThread::worker, this);
      }

      void worker(void) {
         // do something
      }

};

I do not get any error when compiling. But on runtime, when the worker function exits and the thread ends, I get a "glibc ... free ... invalid pointer" error.

I guess this comes from the fact that, according to the boost doc, the thread_specific_ptr tries to delete the object it points to when threads end. But I do not see how to solve the problem.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The thread specific pointer takes ownership. You could reset it:

p_timeline_ctx.reset(0);

or intialize it with a deep copy in the first place:

ptr.reset(new MyDataStruct(d));

However, you'd be far better off just passing the reference as an argument to the thread pointer.

In fact, the worker is already an instance member function, so, why do you need a thread-specific copy of this:

#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>

#include <iostream>

struct MyDataClass { };

class MyThread {
    private :
        boost::thread t;
        MyDataClass d;

    public :
        MyThread(): d() {}

        void start(void) {
            t = boost::thread(&MyThread::worker, this);
        }

        void worker() {
            // just use this->d here
        }
};

int main()
{
}

Or using a static thread function:

#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>

#include <iostream>

struct MyDataClass { };

class MyThread {
    private :
        boost::thread t;
        MyDataClass d;

    public :
        MyThread(): d() {}

        void start(void) {
            t = boost::thread(&MyThread::worker, boost::ref(d));
        }

        static void worker(MyDataClass&) {
            // do something
        }
};

int main()
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
The main reason I use a thread_specific_ptr is that not only all the threads created from the MyThread class need to access their own MyDataClass object, but the program main thread also does need to access its own! The access occurs in a static function where access to the MyThread class is not possible (since it does not even exist for the program main thread) : that is why I used something like : static void utilFunction() { do_something(p_thread_specific_data.get()); } –  Silverspur Apr 8 '14 at 14:32
    
Anyhow, I think my two samples should give you enough starting points to do this, without clouding the ownership semantics –  sehe Apr 8 '14 at 14:56

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