Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a piece of code as follows:

char* foo(char* str1)
{  
    str1 = "Some other text";
    cout << "String Inside Function::" << str1 << endl;

    return str1;
}

int main()
{  
    char* str = "This is a string";

    cout << "String Before Function call::" << str << endl;
    foo(str);
    cout<<"String After Function call::"<<str<<endl;

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

But the cout after my function call gives me "This is a string" even though I have changed it in my foo function. I'm confused here although I know it has got something to do with me not passing the correct address.

share|improve this question
4  
Everything except for references are passed by value in C++, including pointers. –  chris Apr 8 '14 at 16:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
// Adding & (aka pass by reference) after the char* you can modify the pointer that you passed into foo function
// but you must understand that it was another place in memory!!!
void foo(char*& str1)
{  
    // This string saved in global section and here you
    // changed not the text in the str1 but the pointer itself
    str1 = "Some other text"; 
    cout << "String Inside Function::" << str1 << endl;
}

// Another way to change pointer itself is pass a pointer to the pointer
void foo_v2(char** str1)
{
    // You should dereference pointer to pointer (* before str1)
    *str1 = "Some other text";
}

// In this case you change the content at the pointer str1
// It very dangerous, you can replace content not only the memory under str1
// but even return address if string placed in stack memory.
// Such terrible things occurred if your string that copied into str1 
// occupied more bytes then it can be contained in str1
// More safe way is using for example std::string
void foo2(char* str1)
{    
     char *s = "Some other text";
     strcpy(str1, s, strlen(s));
}

int main()
{  
    char* str = "This is a string";

    cout << "String Before Function call::" << str << endl;
    foo(str);
    cout<<"String After Function call::"<<str<<endl;

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this answer

You are changing the pointers value and not what it points to.

share|improve this answer
    
How do i change what it points to through a function? –  anilLuwang Apr 8 '14 at 16:14
    
Replace the input Parameter to a reference like char*& p_char. –  sgtHale Apr 8 '14 at 16:24

When you pass a pointer by copy, the function you call gets a copy of that pointer, just as passing by copy of any other type means you can't modify the original, passing by pointer works in the same way.

void f(char* copy)
{
    // the copy here is modified to point to test
    copy = "Test";       
}

void g(char* copy)
{
   g[0] = 'C';
}

int main()
{
   char* p = nullptr;

   // f gets a copy of p, p cannot be modified by f
   f(p);

   char p2[5] = "copy";

   // g gets a copy of p2, the value of p2 (the pointer) cannot be modified by g
   // however, g can modify what p2 points to
   g(p2);

   // prints "Copy" (not "copy")
   cout << p2;
}

If you want to change what a pointer "points to" via a function, you have to do that in the same way that you would change any other type passed to a function. Either through a pointer (double pointer in this case) or reference (preferred).

void make_c(char** c)
{
   *c = new char[10];
}

void make_c(char*& c)
{
   c = new char[10];
}

int main()
{
   char* t = nullptr;

   // via pointer (double pointer in this case)
   make_c(&t);

   delete [] t;

   // via reference
   make_c(t);

   delete [] t;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.