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I am faced with an issue returning data records. I first wanted to find records where a certain value existed '0000' in a column doing a join for 2 tables. Below is my T-SQL;

    SELECT ColumnA, ColumnB, ColumnC
            FROM Table1, Table2
            WHERE  Table1.ColumnB. = Table2.ColumnB
            and ColumnC='0000'

This returns the desired data records where '0000' exists at least once in all returned records.

The question I have is, how do I do the same, only returning Distinct records where '0000' is the only value that exists (one or many times) and no other value exists for the returned data records

Many thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
SELECT distinct ColumnA, ColumnB
           FROM Table1, Table2
          WHERE Table1.ColumnB = Table2.ColumnB
            and ColumnC = '0000'
except 
SELECT distinct ColumnA, ColumnB
           FROM Table1, Table2
          WHERE Table1.ColumnB = Table2.ColumnB
            and ColumnC <> '0000'

if you want to use a join
guessing ColumnC is in Table2

SELECT distinct Table1.ColumnA, Table1.ColumnB, Table2.ColumnC
           FROM Table1
           JOIN Table2
             on Table1.ColumnB = Table2.ColumnB
            and Table2.ColumnC = '0000'
           left join Table2 exclude 
             on Table1.ColumnB = exclude.ColumnB
            and exclude.ColumnC <> '0000'
          where exclude.ColumnB is null

this may be the best performer

SELECT distinct Table1.ColumnA, Table1.ColumnB, Table2.ColumnC
           FROM Table1
           JOIN Table2
             on Table1.ColumnB = Table2.ColumnB
            and Table2.ColumnC = '0000'
            and not exists (select * from table2 exclude  
                             where exclude.ColumnB = Table1.ColumnB 
                               and exclude.ColumnC <> '0000')
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Are you going to give the NOT IN and NOT EXISTS solutions as well? –  Conrad Frix Apr 8 '14 at 20:24
    
@ConradFrix I thought about the NOT EXISTS. It might be the best performer. I am not sure if you can get away without joining inside the exclude? –  Blam Apr 8 '14 at 20:32
    
Thanks, Blam! FYI, the first query does not appear to be excluding where t2.columnc can be something else other than '0000' I have one to many records where I may have '0000' as a value that matches a return record but the same related parent record cannot have any value other than '0000' be returned and counted. The first query returned 96772 records The other 2 queries matched the same record count (57263) to each other and also to the query supplied by Conrad Frix. Many thanks to both who so graciously provided solutions quickly! Do I credit one or both for answer? –  rogabone Apr 9 '14 at 15:52
    
Are you sure? That is what an except statement does. –  Blam Apr 9 '14 at 16:12
    
Correct, however query 1 with the except is returning more records, this is due to the query not limiting to those records that ONLY contain the value '0000'. It is also providing records that do have '0000' and in some cases other values for Table2.columnC. Table1.columnB is a PK and a unique value, also matches the value in Table2.ColmnB, however this record has many to one relationship and matching records (Table2.ColumnC). I want records that ONLY contain value of '0000' that roll up to the ID for table1.columnB and no other possible values in Table2.ColumnC. –  rogabone Apr 9 '14 at 17:29

Here's a solution using the ALL keyword

SELECT DISTINCT
       columna, 
       columnb, 
       columnc 
FROM   table1 t1 
       INNER JOIN table2 t2 
               ON table1.columnb = table2.columnb 
WHERE  t2.columnc = '0000' 
       AND t2.columnc = ALL (SELECT columnc 
                             FROM   table2 t2Check 
                             WHERE  t2.columnb = t2Check.columb) 

Here's a Example where I'm using only one table since the joins in your problem aren't actually important.

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+1 Can you figure why expect in my answer would not be working (according to the OP) –  Blam Apr 9 '14 at 18:07
    
My guess is that the OP included COLUMNC in the select clauses –  Conrad Frix Apr 9 '14 at 18:28

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