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I am removing the rightmost zeros in a list of integers (they can only be 0 or 1) as follows:

For i As Integer = Product.Count - 1 To 0 Step -1
    If Product(i) = 0 Then
        Product.RemoveAt(i)
    Else
        Exit For
    End If
Next

Could you suggest a solution less awkward and possibly more efficient of what I am currently doing.

If possible I'd like also to see an alternative solution for preserving 1 zero, if the list contains 1 zero and 1 zero only. Thank you (language, c# of vb.net is immaterial).

(PS. Note that "efficiency", which is part of the question, is an objective criterion, not based on opinions.)

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by bzlm, Mike Dinescu, Will Eddins, Pedro Romano, Blazemonger Apr 8 '14 at 18:30

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
In terms of efficiency, there's not much more you can do. Your solution is already O(n) and you can't do better than that. As for elegance, that's highly subjective.. – Mike Dinescu Apr 8 '14 at 17:08
    
What does "removing the rightmost zeros" mean? From your code, it looks like you just want the 1's? – Khan Apr 8 '14 at 17:08
1  
It looks fine to me though assuming this is encapsulated into a single method. Anything else is going to be purely syntactic sugar. – TyCobb Apr 8 '14 at 17:09
1  
Your solution is already O(n) and I understood it even though my understanding of vb.net is minimal, that implies readability is good and it appears elegant to me even. Please do not underestimate your solution. You may get many answers for this but as for efficiency your algo will trump all. – Sourav 'Abhi' Mitra Apr 8 '14 at 17:13
1  
Thank you @Abhi. It's kind to hear. In the meantime I can see a lot of interesting proposals are arriving and I will study them all with interest. In my code above the for could run to 1 instead of 0 to "preserve" the case when product = 0. Later I will mark the answer with larger consensus from you experts. – Pam Apr 8 '14 at 17:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd do this:

public void RemoveTrailingZeros( List<int> digits )
{
  int i = digits.Count ;
  while ( --i >= 0 && digits[i] == 0 )
  {
    digits.RemoveAt(i) ;
  }
  return ;
}

Even tidier:

static void RemoveTrailingZeroes( List<int> digits )
{
  int i = 1 + digits.FindLastIndex( x => x != 0 ) ;
  digits.RemoveRange(i,digits.Count-i) ;
  return ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be removing even the zeros 'inside' the number represented by the list. no ? – Pam Apr 8 '14 at 17:40
1  
No, this will exit the loop as soon as it hits a non-zero digit. It works, but isn't any more elegant or clean than the original solution in my opinion (though it avoids the "early break") – BradleyDotNET Apr 8 '14 at 17:42
1  
@LordTakkera: it avoids the gratuitous if-then-else construct in the loop body. – Nicholas Carey Apr 8 '14 at 17:59
1  
@Pam, that change would do as you requested. Changing it to strictly greater than would accomplish the same purpose. This solution is basically the same as the original (with the if-else replaced by making it a while loop, which is better practice). Otherwise it shares the same performance and "elegance" characteristics, hence my comment. – BradleyDotNET Apr 8 '14 at 18:11
1  
I'd imagine so, given that List<T uses an array as its backing store, but I can't say I've actually looked at it. – Nicholas Carey Apr 11 '14 at 23:58

If the values can only be 0 or 1, you could search for the last 1 and remove everything after that.

    Dim index As Integer
    index = Product.LastIndexOf(1) + 1
    Product.RemoveRange(index, Product.Count - index)

If the list only contains 0 the index will be equal to 0, so you could add an if statment right before the RemoveRange.

    Dim index As Integer
    index = Product.LastIndexOf(1) + 1
    If index = 0 Then index = 1
    Product.RemoveRange(index, Product.Count - index)

(This might crash if there are no items in the list)

Update

Since it's searching for 1, the index of the first 0 will be the index returned +1. This also fix the issue of the function returning -1 when it's all zeros.

share|improve this answer
    
Neat method! According to MSDN, LastIndexOf returns -1 if not found (not 0). – BradleyDotNET Apr 8 '14 at 17:16
    
@LordTakkera I add +1 after the LastIndexOf so it'll be 0. – the_lotus Apr 8 '14 at 17:18
    
You are right (just saw that :) ). You may want to consider adding that to your explanation, because reading it I assumed 0 was not found, and it took careful examination of the code to determine that it was otherwise. – BradleyDotNET Apr 8 '14 at 17:19
    
Added some more info for that. – the_lotus Apr 8 '14 at 17:24
2  
I'm not saying it is producing wrong results (it look correct), but it does not make intention of the code clear. +1 feels like random hack rather than well placed code. – Alexei Levenkov Apr 8 '14 at 18:02

I'm not sure its any more elegant, but it does use LINQ!

int lastOne = i.IndexOf(i.Last(n => n == 1));
List<int> trimmedList = i.Take(lastOne + 1); //Account for zero-based index

To get the single zero, I would use LastOrDefault

int lastOne = i.IndexOf(i.LastOrDefault(n => n == 1));
List<int> trimmedList = i.Take(lastOne + 1); //Account for zero-based index

By far the "coolest" LINQ method, as suggested by Alexi Levenkov:

Reverse().SkipWhile(i=> i==0).Reverse();

This will remove the single zero case, in which case I would use a ternary:

i.All(n => n == 0) ? i.Take(1) : i.Reverse().SkipWhile(i=> i==0).Reverse();
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting Lord. Thank you – Pam Apr 8 '14 at 17:52
    
+1... Warning: I'm not sure I like my suggestion with Reverse anymore :) - it should be used strictly for education/entrainment purposes - Reverse.Skip.Reverse is possible to read, but with special case for Count()==1 I'd spend too much time trying to read it. – Alexei Levenkov Apr 8 '14 at 18:01
1  
Agreed that the reverse method isn't as readable as the others. It still has "cool" points though :) – BradleyDotNET Apr 8 '14 at 18:04

Just trim :)

Product.TrimEnd('0');
share|improve this answer
1  
This works for a string, not a list of ints as in the question. – BradleyDotNET Apr 8 '14 at 17:22
    
Thank you anyway for the try Anton. – Pam Apr 8 '14 at 17:33
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. – stephenbayer Apr 8 '14 at 17:57
1  
@stephenbayer, its an incorrect answer, granted, but I wouldn't say its not an attempt at an answer. – BradleyDotNET Apr 8 '14 at 18:06
    
oops, for reason I thought it was a string. Sorry. – Anton Gorlin Apr 9 '14 at 5:38

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