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I'm trying to make a function to append a list with a single item. What it's doing though is returning a dot pair.

(define (append lst x)
  (cond
    ((null? lst) x)
    (else (cons (car lst) (append (cdr lst) x)))))

The output I'm getting is

> (append '(1 2 3 4 5 6 7) 8)
(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 . 8)

I'm trying to get

(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8)

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

(define (append lst x)
  (cond
    ((null? lst) (cons x '())) ; here's the change
    (else (cons (car lst) (append (cdr lst) x)))))

Notice that all proper lists must end in the empty list, otherwise it'll happen what you just experienced. To put it in another way:

(cons 1 (cons 2 3))
=> '(1 2 . 3) ; an improper list

(cons 1 (cons 2 (cons 3 '())))
=> '(1 2 3)   ; a proper list
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+1 For beating me for 5 sec :) –  Pedrom Apr 8 at 20:25
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If you are allowed to use append there is no reason why not. It performs pretty much the same as what you are trying since append is O(n) where n is the number of elements in the first list. This is just less code.

;; append element to last
(define (append-elt lst x)
  (append lst (list x)))
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1  
Probably not allowed - this is probably CS homework where the point is to learn how to implement append (and probably required to use a DrScheme/DrRacket sub-language that doesn't have append defined). –  Andrew Medico Apr 8 at 21:10
    
@AndrewMedico I have a feeling it isn't allowed but I think it belongs as an answer to the question. –  Sylwester Apr 8 at 21:21
    
I've seen people name this snoc, i.e. cons reversed. [As for homework, if someone doesn't fess up in their question, tough beans. Your answer is good.] –  Greg Hendershott Apr 9 at 0:19
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