Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is the scenario. I've got a class that will be accessed by multiple threads (ASP.NET) that can benefit from storing a result in a write-once, read-many cache. This cached object is the result of an operation that cannot be performed as part of a static initializer, but must wait for the first execution. So I implement a simple null check as seen below. I'm aware that if two threads hit this check at the same moment I will have ExpensiveCalculation calculated twice, but that isn't the end of the world. My question is, do I need to worry about the static _cachedResult still being seen as null by other threads due to optimizations or other thread caching. Once written, the object is only ever read so I don't think full-scale locking is needed.

public class Bippi
{

   private static ExpensiveCalculation _cachedResult;

   public int DoSomething(Something arg)
   {

      // calculate only once.  recalculating is not harmful, just wastes time.
      if (_cachedResult == null);
         _cachedResult = new ExpensiveCalculation(arg);


      // additional work with both arg and the results of the precalculated
      //    values of _cachedResult.A, _cachedResult.B, and _cachedResult.C
      int someResult = _cachedResult.A + _cachedResult.B + _cachedResult.C + arg.ChangableProp;
      return someResult;

   }

}

public class ExpensiveCalculation
{

   public int A { get; private set; }
   public int B { get; private set; }
   public int C { get; private set; }

   public ExpensiveCalculation(Something arg)
   {
      // arg is used to calculate A, B, and C
   }

}

Additional notes, this is in a .NET 4.0 application.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

My question is, do I need to worry about the static _cachedResult still being seen as null by other threads due to optimizations or other thread caching.

Yes, you do. That's one of the primary reasons volatile exists.

And it's worth mentioning that uncontested locks add an entirely negligible performance cost, so there's really no reason to just to just lock the null check and resource generation, as it's almost certainly not going to cause any performance problems, and makes the program much easier to reason about.

And the best solution is to avoid the question entirely and use a higher level of abstraction that is specifically designed to solve the exact problem that you have. In this case, that means Lazy. You can create a Lazy object that defines how to create your expensive resource, access it wherever you need the object, and the Lazy implementation becomes responsible for ensuring that the resource is created no more than once, and that it is properly exposed to the code asking for said resource, and that it is handled efficiently.

share|improve this answer
    
The lock comment is duly noted, thanks. –  tcarvin Apr 8 '14 at 20:55
    
Cough. Yeah. Right. I have some code here we got 25% faster when we moved from multi to single threaded (and instead distributed batches to different cores). Happens all the "no cost" locks really did add up. –  TomTom Apr 8 '14 at 20:56
1  
@TomTom Then your locks almost certainly weren't uncontested. Your operations were all competing for the same scarce resources. It also takes a lot of time to start up and tear down threads, in addition to synchronizing them. There are all sorts of reasons for your problems, none of which is justification for not using a lock in the context described here. –  Servy Apr 8 '14 at 20:58
1  
@TomTom The cost is on the order of a couple of nanoseconds. In the context described here, that can almost certainly be equated to zero. In some other contexts, possibly not, but here, almost certainly yes. –  Servy Apr 8 '14 at 21:01
1  
@TomTom The cost for an uncontended lock (well in HotSpot, the CLR is generally less efficient here though, but not by that much), is basically the cost of a CAS. Worst case on x86 that's 100 cycles and draining the store buffers. Call it 300 cycles. That amounts to about 90ns on a modern CPU. That's damn close to "free". False sharing or actually contended locks are a much more likely explanation for a 25% performance increase.. –  Voo Apr 8 '14 at 21:20

You need not need volatile, you - especially - need a memory barrier so that the processor caches synchronize.

share|improve this answer
2  
That is exactly what volatile will do; it will ensure the appropriate memory barriers are in place... –  Servy Apr 8 '14 at 20:51
    
Except that volatile is the worst possible performance wise memory barrier. –  TomTom Apr 8 '14 at 20:52
    
How so? And what are you comparing it to? –  Servy Apr 8 '14 at 20:53
    
3  
@TomTom So first off, that's almost certainly premature optimization. The described change, in the context of this question, is almost certainly going to be negligible, probably not even measurable. That's describing a very different situation from what is described here. It's describing a situation in with a variable is accessed many times from within a lock block, and only once outside of it. Memory barriers are being applied inside the lock block needlessly, because the lock already applies those guarantees. That isn't happening here at all, there is no lock. –  Servy Apr 8 '14 at 21:00

I think you can altogether optimistically avoid locking, and yet avoid volatile performance penalties. You can test for nullability in a two-step fashion.

  object readonly _cachedResultLock = new object();

  ...

  if (_cachedResult == null)
  {
     lock(_cachedResultLock)
     {
         if (_cachedResult == null)
         {
             _cachedResult = new ExpensiveCalculation(arg);
         }
     }
   }

Here most of the time you will not reach lock and will not serialize access. You may serialize access only on first access - but will guarantee that work is not wasted (though may cause another thread to wait a bit while first one finishes ExpensiveCalculation).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.