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UPDATE I see I wasn't clear on the original question. Given a list

last_eqn=[[3], [2, 1]]

and a list dictionary:

{2: [[5], [3, 1]],
3: [[8], [5, 1]],
5: [[13], [8, 1]],
8: [[21], [13, 1]],
13: [[34], [21, 1]],
21: [[55], [34, 1]],
34: [[89], [55, 1]]}

Substitute for every number in last_eqn, with the value of the key if key==number in the last_eqn. For Eg:

[[3], [2, 1]] = [[[[8], [5, 1]]], [2, 1]] = 
[[[[8], [[[13], [8, 1]], 1]]], [2, 1]] = 
[[[[[[21], [13, 1]]], [[[13], [[[21], [13, 1]], 1]], 1]]], [2, 1]]

I have an initial list:

last_eqn=[[3], [2, 1]]

and a dictionary frame

{2: [[5], [3, 1]],
3: [[8], [5, 1]],
5: [[13], [8, 1]],
8: [[21], [13, 1]],
13: [[34], [21, 1]],
21: [[55], [34, 1]],
34: [[89], [55, 1]]}

I want to substitute the values of numbers in last_eqn till all the numbers boil down to the last (here they will be in terms of 89 and 55) That is the structure of each list.

I wrote this:

def recur_subs(last_eqn,frame=frame):
    """
    {2: [[5], [3, 1]],
    3: [[8], [5, 1]],
    5: [[13], [8, 1]],
    8: [[21], [13, 1]],
    13: [[34], [21, 1]],
    21: [[55], [34, 1]],
    34: [[89], [55, 1]]}
    """
    for key in frame:
        fst,scnd = last_eqn
        fst_num,scnd_num=fst[0],scnd[0]
        #fst_marker,scnd_marker = 0,0
        while not isinstance(fst_num,int):
            #fst_marker += 1
            fst_num = fst_num[0] 
        while not isinstance(scnd_num,int):
            #scnd_marker += 1
            scnd_num = scnd_num[0]
        print fst_num,scnd_num
        if isinstance(fst_num,int) and fst_num in frame:
            fst[0] = (frame[fst_num])
        if isinstance(scnd_num,int) and scnd_num in frame: 
            scnd[0] = (frame[scnd_num])
        last_eqn = [fst,scnd]
        print last_eqn

It doesn't solve properly. Im trying to correct it but here's the output:

recur_subs(last_eqn,frame)
55 89
[[[[55], [34, 1]]], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]
55 89
[[[[55], [34, 1]]], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]
55 89
[[[[55], [34, 1]]], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]
55 89
[[[[55], [34, 1]]], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]
55 89
[[[[55], [34, 1]]], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]
55 89
[[[[55], [34, 1]]], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]
55 89
[[[[55], [34, 1]]], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]

This is slow but I want to get down to the correct way of solving it. The values should be searched and substituted properly going down till [[89], [55, 1]]

share|improve this question
    
Would you please explain how substitution works? –  Hai Vu Apr 8 at 21:18
    
@HaiVu Just updated the Question. –  user2290820 Apr 8 at 21:29
    
You could check if an element in iterable then iterate it if it is. But I think maybe you should step back and re evaluate what you are trying to do. Data like this would quickly become unmanageable. –  cmd Apr 8 at 21:43
    
Should [[3], [2, 1]] ==> [[[[8], [5, 1]]], [[[5], [3, 1]], 1]]? I mean number 2 should be substituded, too. Correct? –  Hai Vu Apr 8 at 21:53
    
@HaiVu Oh yes definitely! Thanks for pointing out –  user2290820 Apr 9 at 16:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you want to recursively substitute those items, you have to call, at some point, the substitution function in itself. In the recurs_subs function, I replace every first number of the lists in last_eqn by the corresponding list of lists in the dictionary, in which I have substituted numbers too, by passing them to recurs_subs first.

import copy

def recur_subs(last_eqn, frame):
    for item in last_eqn:
        if type(item[0]) == int and item[0] in frame:
            substitute = copy.deepcopy(frame[item[0]])
            item[0] = recur_subs(substitute, frame)

    return last_eqn

Output:

[[[[[[[[55], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]], [[[[[89], [55, 1]]], [[[55],[[[89],
[55, 1]], 1]], 1]], 1]]], [[[[[[[89], [55, 1]]], [[[55], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]],
1]]], [[[[[55], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]], [[[[[89], [55, 1]]], [[[55], [[[89],
[55, 1]], 1]], 1]], 1]], 1]], 1]]], [[[[[[[[[89], [55, 1]]], [[[55], [[[89],
[55, 1]], 1]], 1]]], [[[[[55], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]], [[[[[89], [55, 1]]],
[[[55], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]], 1]], 1]], 1]]], [[[[[[[55], [[[89], [55, 1]],
1]]], [[[[[89], [55, 1]]], [[[55], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]], 1]], 1]]],
[[[[[[[89], [55, 1]]], [[[55], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]], 1]]], [[[[[55],
[[[89], [55, 1]], 1]]], [[[[[89], [55, 1]]], [[[55], [[[89], [55, 1]], 1]],
1]], 1]], 1]], 1]], 1]], 1]]

As you can see, I also decided to copy the list of lists to prevent modifying objects stored in the list dictionary.

But maybe you want those objects to be modified, since the substitutions would be the same anyway. It would probably make the substitutions faster, since the substitution for a 2 would be stored in memory instead of computed at every 2 encountered, and so on for every substituted numbers.

If this is the case, just remove the deep copy and directly pass frame[item[0]] to recurs_subs.

share|improve this answer
    
I got the same output. So, that either means we are correct, or we misunderstood the OP. –  Hai Vu Apr 8 at 23:46
    
Oh yes indeed. I didn't see your edit when writing my answer. I believe we understood it right. –  Fury Apr 9 at 1:30
    
Yes that is correct. –  user2290820 Apr 9 at 16:20

I don't fully understand your algorithm, but I made a guess, which could be wrong. How about something like this?

def my_substitution(last_equation, frame=frame):
   while True:
       key = last_equation[1][0]
       print last_equation
       if key in frame:
           last_equation = frame[key]
       else:
           break
   print last_equation

Output:

[[3], [2, 1]]
[[5], [3, 1]]
[[8], [5, 1]]
[[13], [8, 1]]
[[21], [13, 1]]
[[34], [21, 1]]
[[55], [34, 1]]
[[89], [55, 1]]
[[89], [55, 1]]

Update

Let me make sure that I understand your algorithm correctly.

  1. Let's start out trying to substitute just once. I named my function substitute_once().
  2. For substitute_once(), let's try the simplest input:

    >>> substitute_once(2)
    [[5], [3, 1]]
    
  3. If the input is a list, then substitute_once() will call itself recursively for each element:

    >>> substitute_once([[3], [2, 1]])
    [[[[8], [5, 1]]], [[[5], [3, 1]], 1]]
    

    This is because we replace both the 3 with [[8], [5, 1]] and 2 with [[5], [3, 1]]

  4. Assume that we know how to replace it once, we can do it repeatedly until we can no longer replace. In other word, substitute_once(the_list) == the_list.

If my assumptions are correct, then here is how I would do it:

def substitute_once(n, frame=frame):
    if isinstance(n, list):
        return [substitute_once(x) for x in n]
    if n in frame:
        return frame[n]
    else:
        return n

def substitute_recursively(last_equation,frame=frame):
    while True:
        new_equation = substitute_once(last_equation)
        print new_equation
        if new_equation == last_equation:
            break
        last_equation = new_equation

Discussion

  • substitutte_once() is straight-forward, as I have discussed it in bullet points 1-3 above.
  • substitute_recursively() is equally simple because we only solve a small problem: just call substitute_once() repeatedly until the new list and old are the same, meaning we can no longer make any substitution.

The final output is so long, I don't see any point showing it. Please let me know if this is what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
I just updated the question.I hope that clarifies a bit. I could learn something from that code btw. –  user2290820 Apr 8 at 21:29
    
Please see my update. –  Hai Vu Apr 8 at 22:15
    
You've broken it down in modular form.great! –  user2290820 Apr 9 at 16:16

Recursively substitute each element in the list (of list of list of list...)

def recsub( last_eqn ):

    if type(last_eqn) != list:
        if last_eqn in repdic:
            last_eqn = repdic[last_eqn]
    else:
        for i in range(len(last_eqn)):
            last_eqn[i] = recsub( last_eqn[i] )

    return last_eqn

And check if the new list is same as the old list. You need a deepcopy operation for this.

last_eqn=[[3], [2, 1]]
A = last_eqn
B = 0

import copy

while 1:
    recsub(A)
    if A==B:
        break
    else:
        B=copy.deepcopy(A)
share|improve this answer

UPDATE

I agree with Hai Vu's,Fury's,ysakamoto's answers. With Hai's, functions were clearly broken down very well. Fury's was more inherently in nature and concise though. I modified my recur_subs code and I did a compare with all answers here:

last_eqn=[[3], [2, 1]]

%timeit recsub(last_eqn) #ysakomoto's
10000 loops, best of 3: 174 µs per loop

%timeit recur_subs(last_eqn,frame) #mine
10000 loops, best of 3: 168 µs per loop

%timeit recur_subs2(last_eqn,frame) #Fury's
1000000 loops, best of 3: 578 ns per loop

i.e. 0.578 micro-sec /loop

%timeit substitute_recursively(last_eqn,frame) #Hai Vu's
1000 loops, best of 3: 361 µs per loop

%timeit substitute_recursively(last_eqn,frame) #Hai Vu's No Print just return
10000 loops, best of 3: 145 µs per loop

And here's my code:

def recur_subs(last_eqn,frame=frame):
    """
    last_eqn=[[3], [2, 1]]
    {2: [[5], [3, 1]],
    3: [[8], [5, 1]],
    5: [[13], [8, 1]],
    8: [[21], [13, 1]],
    13: [[34], [21, 1]],
    21: [[55], [34, 1]],
    34: [[89], [55, 1]]}
    """
    for enum,lst_item in enumerate(last_eqn):
        if isinstance(lst_item,int):
            if lst_item in frame:
                last_eqn[enum] = recur_subs(frame[lst_item])
        elif isinstance(lst_item,list): lst_item = recur_subs(lst_item)
    return last_eqn

If I'm correct Fury's code executes fastest to slowest: Fury's > Hai Vu's(no print) > mine > ysakomoto's

share|improve this answer
1  
Wow, thanks for those tests. The difference in speed comes from the fact that I goes through last_eqn only once, substituting the numbers in the substitutions before putting them in last_eqn, while the other approaches loop over it as many time as necessary, going deeper at each iteration of the loop, but restarting from the first list every time. I also made a little observation on your final function: lst_item = recur_subs(lst_item) You don't need to set lst_item, as it is modified in place (lists are mutable) and you don't use it after this line, just use recur_subs(lst_item). –  Fury Apr 10 at 18:14
    
@Fury Hey! first of all thanks for insight and I am going to try that soon and would that make up for some speed anyway? It's just assigning value though. –  user2290820 Apr 11 at 12:04
    
Yeah, I don't think so. Well, probably a little, since every action takes time, but yeah, absolutely nothing even worse worrying. I just thought about it because I saw you assigning that variable, but not using it. –  Fury Apr 11 at 18:06

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